Karina Walters Video Series

Karina Walters, M.S.W., Ph.D., delivered the 2018 Brown Foundation Research Lecture, Embodiment of Historical Trauma and Micro-aggression Distress: Lessons from 10 years of research with American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Walters, an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, is the Associate Dean for Research, the Katherine Hall Chambers Scholar, and the Co-Director and Principal Investigator of the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI; NIMHD P60MD006909) at the University of Washington. IWRI is one of 16 National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities Comprehensive Centers of Excellence and one of two devoted to American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) research in the country. Walters has more than 20 years of experience in social epidemiological research on the historical, social and cultural determinants of health among AIAN populations as well as chronic disease prevention research (e.g., HIV, AOD, obesity). Walters has presented at more than 350 national and international conferences; was an invited speaker for Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series (WALS) at the NIH; and was a Fulbright scholar at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Walters received her B.A. (sociology) in 1987, her M.S.W. (clinical) in 1990, and her Ph.D. in 1995, all from the University of California, Los Angeles.