2015 News about the School for Social Work


SSW Partners with Military Radio Network

Kathryn Basham featured on radio show

Professor Kathryn Basham headshotThanks to a connection made by a Smith alumna, SSW has established a partnership with Veteran Caregiver and Military Network Radio, to better communicate research and care strategies for Veterans, service members, and their families, and to reach a broader audience.

Kathryn Basham, SSW professor and co-director of the Ph.D. program, leads the School's efforts in training students to work with Veterans, service members, and their family. Now, she has teamed up with Smith College alumna, Linda Kreter, to share her expertise with a wider audience through Kreter's Military Network Radio.

Read more: SSW Partners With Military Radio Network



SSW Strides for Social Justice in the Hot Chocolate Run

SSW team icon for Hot Chocolate RunOn Sunday, December 6, a team from SSW gathered at the 12th Annual Hot Chocolate Run to begin the day with "School spirit!"

Our team members included people taking part in the 3K walk, 5K Fun Run, and 5K race, as well as volunteers and supporters ready to cheer on our walkers and runners. At the end of the course, we all enjoyed the abundant hot chocolate!

In addition to taking part in the day's events, team SSW Strides for Social Justice raised money for Safe Passage the sponsor of the annual Hot Chocolate Run. Safe Passage is a non-profit that provides services to those affected by domestic violence -- a cause close to many of our hearts.

As of 12/7, we have raised $570 toward our goal of $1000. But there's still time to donate! Donations made before 12/31 count towards our total. To make a donation to our team, follow the link below!
 


The SSW Strides for Social Justice team included faculty, staff and family members:
 

  • Karissa (Pastyrnak) Raynor, enrollment coordinator (team captain)
  • Joan Berzoff, professor
  • Denise Brown, coordinator of the doctoral program
  • Rory Crath, assistant professor
  • Toby Davis, assistant director of continuing education and admission systems specialist
  • Randy Furash-Stewart
  • Pat Gilbert, administrative coordinator for the office of alumni affairs and development
  • Valerie Hooper-Lindros, senior associate director of graduate enrollment
  • Charlie Hooper-Lindros
  • Tara Lindros
  • Irene Rodriguez-Martin, associate dean for graduate enrollment and student services
  • Molly Meehan, temporary executive assistant to the dean
  • Maddy Neely, administrative coordinator for the office of the dean
  • Dave Neely
  • Quinn Neely
  • Peggy O'Neill, associate dean for academic affairs
  • Tynan Power, communications specialist
  • Doreen Underdue, communications assistant
  • Laurie Wyman, administrative assistant
  • Marianne Yoshioka, dean of the School

Photo credit for second photo:
DoubleShot Photography.
More great event photos at http://doubleshotphotography.zenfolio.com.





 

Thank you to all members of our team and everyone in our SSW community who supported our effort!

 


Getting ready for the annual Hot Chocolate Run!

This year, the School for Social Work is participating as a team in Northampton's 12th annual Hot Chocolate Run! The event will take place at 9am on Sunday, December 6, 2015, and includes a 3k walk, a 5k "fun run" and a 5k race. Our team includes runners, walkers, volunteers, and a cheering contingent!

The Hot Chocolate Run is a fun family-friendly event that brings thousands of people to the center of Northampton. At the end of the walk or run, participants receive a mug designed by local cartoonist Hilary Price ("Rhymes with Orange") and abundant, delicious hot chocolate! All registration fees and donations benefit Safe Passage, a Hampshire County non-profit that addresses domestic violence.

All SSW community members are invited to support our team in one (or more) of the following ways:

  • Let us know if you're participating in the Hot Chocolate Run!

  • Come out to the event at 9am on Sunday, December 6, and cheer us on!

  • Tweet your support and be sure to tag @smithcollegessw!

  • If you are participating or watching the event, tag your Instagram photos with @smithcollegessw.

  • Donate on our fundraising page. All donations go directly to support Safe Passage.

  • Share our fundraising link with your own network on Facebook and Twitter.
    (That link again is http://www.hotchocolaterun.com/give/?tid=2433&eid=2177).

This event is organized by the SSW S.O.C.I.A.L. committee.


Dr. Maria Yellow Horse Brave Heart returns to Smith to give Rapoport Lecture

Delegation from Maine-Wabanaki REACH travels to Northampton to meet esteemed researcher

On July 27, the Smith College School for Social Work welcomed back to campus Maria Yellow Horse Brave Heart, Ph.D. '95, to give the Lydia Rapoport Lecture. Brave Heart's visit not only was an opportunity for the campus community to learn from her work, but also provided an occasion for Smith to bring together an eminent researcher with social work professionals who have significantly benefitted from her work. Among those who attended the lecture and met with Brave Heart was a delegation of Maine-based child welfare social workers, educators, and activists who have embraced Brave Heart's theories and interventions and have implemented them in their work with Native communities.
Read more: Historical Trauma and Unresolved Grief: Implications for Clinical Research and Practice with American Indians and Alaska Natives, a lecture by Maria Yellow Horse Brave Heart


SSW announces 2015 Day-Garrett Award winners

The Smith College School for Social Work is pleased to announce the 2015 Day-Garret Award recipients: Katherine Gabel, Ph.D., J.D., and Marian Harris, Ph.D. Gabel is a Smith alumna who served the School for Social Work as dean from 1976 to 1985. Harris earned her doctorate at the School for Social Work in 1997. Both women have made substantial contributions to the field of social work.

The Day-Garrett Award, established in 1978, is presented annually to one or more individuals who have been outstanding contributors to professional social work and who have been significant members of the Smith College School for Social Work educational community. The award is to be given to those who, in the judgment of the Committee, have personified in their lives and service to the community the high purpose of professional service for which the school is renowned.

The awards will be presented during the School's 89th Commencement on August 14, 2015.


SSW celebrates 25th anniversary of the ADA

On July 26, 2015, the School for Social Work issued a statement in honor of the 25th anniversary of the ADA.

At the School for Social Work, our faculty and staff are committed to working toward greater access in our educational programs. This approach means that fewer students would need to register for classroom accommodations in order to participate fully because, to the greatest extent possible, accessibility would be built into the program. By reducing ableism in how we provide access, we aim to create an educational community in which all participants feel valued.
[Read the full statement honoring the 25th anniversary of the ADA ]

Dr. AndreAs Neumann Mascis headshot Also in honor of the ADA anniversary, the Students Impacted by Ableism group (formerly Disability Awareness Group) is sponsoring a discussion by AndreAs Neumann-Mascis, Ph.D., an SSW faculty member and 2014 Commencement speaker. Neumann-Mascis will discuss the successes and pitfalls of the ADA and its implications for our clinical practice.

The event will be held on Thursday, July 30th, between 5:45 and 6:45 pm in Seelye 201. Refreshments will be provided.


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Historical Trauma & Unresolved Grief: Implications for Clinical Research and Practice with American Indians and Alaska Natives

The Smith College School for Social Work is pleased to welcome alumna Maria Yellow Horse Brave Heart, Ph.D. ('95), to present on "Historical Trauma & Unresolved Grief: Implications for Clinical Research and Practice with American Indians and Alaska Natives" on Monday, July 27.

Brave Heart's lecture will cover the development of the Historical Trauma and Unresolved Grief Intervention (HTUG), a Tribal Best Practice and its utilization in clinical intervention research. HTUG frames current depression, complicated or prolonged grief, and trauma responses within a collective multigenerational context aimed at reducing stigma and fostering increased utilization of traditional tribal cultural protective coping and self-soothing strategies. It also will include discussion of the significant challenges to successful implementation of a clinical study in tribal communities.

Brave Heart (Hunkpapa/Oglala Lakota) is Associate Professor of Psychiatry/Director of Native American and Disparities Research at the University of New Mexico (UNM) Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Community Behavioral Health. She was the founding President/Director of the Takini Network/Institute, based in Rapid City, South Dakota, a Native collective devoted to community healing from intergenerational massive group trauma.

The lecture will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Weinstein Auditorium in Wright Hall on the Smith College campus [map]. All public lecture series lectures are free, open to the public, and wheelchair accessible. Continuing Education Credits (CECs) are available for a small fee with registration.


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Treating Trauma with Plain Old Therapy

On Friday, July 17, Jon G. Allen, Ph.D., will present the E. Diane Davis Lecture on "Treating Trauma with Plain Old Therapy."

In a field dominated academically by a multitude of specialized, evidence-based treatments, generalists need a solid scientific foundation to guide the treatment many actually provide: plain old ("talk") therapy. Attachment theory, now enriched by research on mentalizing, provides that foundation.

Allen is Senior Staff Psychologist and holds the Helen Palley Chair in Mental Health Research at The Menninger Clinic; he is also Professor of Psychiatry in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Baylor College of Medicine.

The lecture will be held at 7:30pm in the Weinstein Auditorium in Wright Hall on the Smith College campus [map]. All public lecture series lectures are free, open to the public, and wheelchair accessible. Continuing Education Credits (CECs) are available for a small fee with registration.

  • For questions or to request accommodations: contact the Office of the Dean at 413-585-7983 or email deanstaff@smith.edu.


Smith College School for Social Work Announces Two New Faculty Members

Dr. Rory Crath and Dr. Maria Torres join the faculty of Smith College


Smith College School for Social Work will added two outstanding scholars to its full-time faculty in July: Dr. Rory Crath, an expert in the production and impact of community disparity and exclusion, and Dr. Maria Torres, a leading voice in racial and ethnic disparities in behavioral health treatment and workforce development.

Dr. Rory Crath "Dr. Rory Crath brings a clear and incisive voice through his research and scholarship to the understanding of the relationship between the governance practices targeting the social lives and health of youth and queer men, as well as the social production of knowledge about these subjects," says Marianne Yoshioka, Dean of the Smith College School for Social Work. "This work has tremendous importance as we as a society are continuously defining what is problematic and who holds responsibility. The implications for his work are striking."

Dr. Maria Torres Dean Yoshioka also observes that Dr. Torres significantly deepens the School's presence in behavioral health and social policy and that her research addresses racial and ethnic disparities in the behavioral health care treatment and the workforce that provides it. "Her work has the power to shape the way that services are delivered to countless individuals," Dean Yoshioka notes. "Dr. Torres's work around racial disparities is important and timely."

Rory Crath, Ph.D. comes to Smith with over 15 years of arts-based advocacy and community development work with queer and transgender youth and young people who identify as immigrants, First Nations, and as people of color. He holds a Ph.D. in social work from the University of Toronto, an M.A. in development studies from the University of Toronto, and a B.A. in political science from McMaster University.

Maria Torres, Ph.D., L.M.H.C., joins Smith College from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University, where she has served as a lecturer and senior research associate at the Institute for Behavioral Health. Her clinical experience includes work as a Licensed Mental Health Clinician and a Program Director supervising frontline clinical and direct service staff in domestic violence programs. Torres holds a Ph.D. in social policy from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University, an M.A. in social policy also from the Heller School, an M.A. in counseling psychology from Lesley University, and a B.A. in business management from Simmons College.

"We are extremely fortunate to have Dr. Torres and Dr. Crath join our faculty," says Dean Yoshioka. "Each brings intellectual rigor and strong record of research and scholarship."


Introducing the 2015-2016 Bertha Capen Reynolds Fellow: Tarek Zidan

BCR Pre-doctorate Fellow Tarek Zidan headshotThe Smith College School for Social Work is pleased to welcome Tarek Zidan to campus as its 2015 Bertha Capen Reynolds Predoctoral Fellow. Zidan is a doctoral candidate at the Howard University School of Social Work in Washington, DC, specializing in clinical social work. His dissertation research focuses on attitudes of Arab Americans toward persons with disabilities.

Zidan brings extensive clinical and teaching experience to his scholarly work. His social work practice has included more than a decade of serving clients who have severe mental illness and intellectual/developmental disabilities as well as immigrant populations. He has published and presented in the substantive areas of stigma toward persons with developmental disabilities, mental health among Muslim Americans, and online social work education.

The Bertha Capen Reynolds (BCR) Fellowship Program provides a twelve-month residential fellowship to a doctoral student in the dissertation phase from any accredited social work Ph.D. program. Created in 1987, this highly competitive fellowship supports the development of scholars from underrepresented groups, whose work promotes both the underlying principles of Reynolds' approach to clinical social work and the mission of the Smith College School for Social Work


Annemarie Gockel Awarded Tenure, Promoted to Associate Professor

The Smith College School for Social Work is very pleased to announce the tenure of faculty member Annemarie Gockel and her promotion to Associate Professor.Dr. Annemarie Gockel Gockel, who joined the program as Assistant Professor in 2009, has established her reputation in the area of mindfulness training. In her research, she has explored the potential of mindfulness practice as a novel form of pedagogy in social work education and clinical training, the effectiveness of a mindfulness training curriculum in elementary schools, and mindfulness as a community-based prevention intervention.

Gockel's research is grounded in her extensive experience as a practitioner with community-based agencies. She began her career as a social worker in an intensive group therapy program for women with addictions. Since then she has worked with adults, youth, and children in a variety of settings, addressing a range of issues.

Being part of the scholarly community of Smith College, with its great attention to teaching, has afforded Gockel the opportunity to put her mindfulness research into action.

"It is the kind of innovative pedagogy that Smith College really welcomes and supports," according to Dean Marianne Yoshioka.

The School for Social Work has nothing but praise for Gockel's research and her groundbreaking pedagogy.

"Dr. Gockel has built a powerful research agenda around issues of mindfulness education," Dean Yoshioka remarks. "She brings a thoughtful intentionality to everything she does-her research and scholarship, her committee work within the school, her teaching of clinical social work practice, and the mindfulness curricula that she has developed and implements across community settings. As a society, we are increasingly looking to understand health and wellness beyond conventional models. Dr. Gockel's work is making an important contribution."


Professor James Drisko Recognized for 25 Years of Service

Smith College School for Social Worker Faculty Member Honored with the Charis Medal


Dr. Jim DriskoEach year, Smith College awards the Charis Medal to those faculty members who have reached the quarter century mark in their service to the college. The Smith College School for Social Work is delighted that the 2015 honorees include our esteemed faculty member, Professor James Drisko. The award celebrates Drisko's longevity, as well as his academic excellence, loyalty, and commitment to teaching and students.

Drisko's tenure at Smith stretches back to his days as a student, as he earned his M.S.W. here before completing a doctorate at Boston College. He teaches in both the M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs and serves at the associate editor of Smith College Studies in Social Work as well. Drisko's scholarly work has focused on clinical practice with children and families, reactive attachment disorder and its treatment, psychotherapy evaluation and qualitative research methods, and he is the co-author of Evidence-based Practice in Clinical Social Work. In recent years, he has also explored technological innovations affecting social work research and social work education. The Charis Medal is one of several honors Drisko has received in recent years. He was also named an inaugural Fellow of the Society for Social Work and Research in 2014, and in 2013, represented the Smith College School for Social Work at the first White House Briefing on Social Work Education.


Vigil for the victims of the Charleston shooting

Image of lit candles on dark backgroundOn June 19th, a vigil was held in the King/Scales courtyard to mourn and bear witness in the aftermath of the killing of nine Black members of the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina.

The vigil drew around 150 people from the School and the local community. It was organized by Rabbi Rhonda Shapiro-Rieser, the SSW Council for Students of Color and others at the School for Social Work.


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Women of Color in Academia: Challenging the Presumption of Incompetence

On June 22, the Smith College School for Social Work was privileged to welcome Carmen G. Gonzalez, J.D. Carmen G. Gonzalez at Smith CollegeGonzalez, a Professor of Law at Seattle University School of Law, was the co-editor of Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia, which sparked a long overdue conversation about the climate that female faculty of color encounter in the nation's colleges and universities.

 

Carmen G. Gonzalez talking with students at Smith CollegeOn Monday evening, Gonzalez presented the School's annual anti-racism lecture on "Women of Color in Academia: Challenging the Presumption of Incompetence." The lecture promoted reflection among faculty and academic leaders about the barriers to professional success and about the concrete measures that can be adopted to foster an equitable and inclusive campus climate.

 

Carmen G. Gonzalez with Dean Yoshioka and members of the Council for Students of Color at Smith CollegeGonzalez remained on campus for several days, during which she took part in numerous discussions with students and faculty. On Wednesday, June 24, she joined Keshia Williams, M.S.W., L.C.S.W., to co-facilitate one of the School's Critical Conversations on Race and Racism. The Critical Conversation was sponsored by the Council of Students of Color and the Anti-Racism Task Force.


SSW Open House draws many to learn about the M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs

Prospective students at open house

 

On Monday, June 15, prospective students gathered at the Smith College Campus Center to learn about the unique strengths and structure of the School for Social Work.

Prospective students at open house

Beginning with a welcome from Dean Marianne Yoshioka, attendees heard an overview from School administrators, then learned about the 21-year history of SSW's anti-racism commitment, the phenomenal 4:1 student/faculty ratio, and the block plan that allows students at Smith to spend roughly twice the number of hours gaining clinical experience compared to their counterparts in other programs.

Paradise Pond and surrounding grounds Paradise Pond and surrounding grounds

Attendees had an opportunity to tour the campus with guides from SSW Admission. Along the way, they learned about the famed Smith College campus, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, and its status as an accredited arboretum. Despite the overcast sky and light rain, the campus maintained its charm.

Enrollment Coordinator Karissa Raynor with prospective students outside Seelye HallDean Yoshioka with open house tour attendeesTour groups stopped at the libraries and classroom buildings, such as Seelye Hall, that are so familiar to SSW students and alumni. (During the tour, one group ran into Dean Yoshioka, who was happy to stop and chat.)

SSW panel with Irene Rodriguez-MartinThe visit to Smith concluded with panels by alumni and students, as well as an opportunity to hear about "What makes a good candidate?" from Irene Rodriguez-Martin, Associate Dean for Graduate Enrollment.

The next stop for our Open House visitors? We suggest following the application links on
our M.S.W Admission and Ph.D. Admission pages.

  • For more information about attending an open house at Smith College School for Social Work: Open Houses & Fairs.


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The Enduring Paradox of Immigrants and Access to Health Care

Margarita Alegria speaking at SmithThe Smith College School for Social Work was pleased to start the 2015 Public Lecture Series in Social Work with the annual Brown Foundation Research lecture. On Monday, June 8, Margarita Alegría, Ph.D., presented on "The Enduring Paradox of Immigrants and Access to Health Care."

Margarita Alegria speaking at SmithBased on research conducted during the past five years, this presentation covered some of the main reasons why immigrants do not appear to access care for their mental health problems as well as the complex challenges today's increasingly connected world of migration poses for culturally
appropriate mental health and substance abuse services.

Margarita Alegria headshot taken at SmithAlegría is the director of the Center for Multicultural Mental Health Research (CMMHR) at Cambridge Health Alliance and Harvard Medical School, and a professor of psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

All public lecture series lectures are free, open to the public, and wheelchair accessible. Continuing Education Credits (CECs) are available for a small fee with registration.


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2015 Public Lecture Series in Social Work

The Smith College School for Social Work is pleased to announce our 2015 Public Lecture Series in Social Work. This annual lecture series features leaders in a variety of topics with direct relevance to clinical social workers. This year's lecture series includes four such experts who will present to audiences that include students, faculty, professional social workers, and members of the public

All Public Lecture Series events will be held at 7:30pm in the Weinstein Auditorium in Wright Hall on the Smith College campus [map]. The lectures are free, open to the public, and wheelchair accessible. Continuing Education Credits (CECs) are available for a small fee with registration.


Professor Josh Miller leading State Department-funded program on tolerance and conflict resolution in Africa

Professor Josh Miller is leading an innovative project that will have significant impact on the work of conflict resolution in Rwanda and Uganda, and on clinical social work training in both the U.S. and abroad. Miller is principal investigator on the Professional Fellows Program: Tolerance and Conflict Resolution in Uganda and Rwanda.

The program is a trilateral exchange that aims to foster mutual understanding, collaboration, global networking, and leadership and professional skills development among Africans and Americans. It is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of State's Bureau for Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), and administered in conjunction with Amherst's Institute for Training & Development (ITD).

The program brings two groups of Africans to the U.S. in the spring and the fall of this year. The first group, nine men and women from Rwanda and Uganda, arrived on April 25 and will remain in the U.S. until June 5. The second group of new fellows will repeat the exchange program, traveling to the U.S. from October 10 to November 20.

Delegation from Rwanda and Uganda upon their arrival in Massachusetts

SSW spends a community service day at the Holyoke Soldiers' Home

"Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much."
~Helen Keller

SSW staff are pictured on Lilly Hall steps wearing the School's T-shirts The t-shirts read Be the Change with an illustration of 4 hands reaching toward a globe, in blue on cream On the afternoon of May 1, a team of SSW staff & faculty members headed to the Soldiers' Home in Holyoke for a day of community service organized by the SSW S.O.C.I.A.L. committee!

Did you know that Smith College provides employees with a day "off" for community service, each year? The SSW S.O.C.I.A.L. committee has organized a number of community service days as a way for SSW faculty & staff to use this benefit to work together on service projects in our community.

Pictured above on the steps of Lilly Hall are some of the project's participants (from left): Melissa Henry, Laura Wyman (in front), Honora Sullivan-Chin, Doreen Underdue, and Sharyn Zuffelato.


Administrative Coordinator Pat Gilbert is awarded a 2015 Spotlight Award

Pat Gilbert's 12 year record of high performance and dedication to the School for Social Work and its alumni has earned her one of the Smith College Spotlight Awards for 2015.Spotlight Award graphic with photo of Pat Gilbert Pat was nominated by Dawn Faucher, who describes her as "hard working, selfless, unflappable and a joy to work with."

In addition to this most recent honor, Pat was awarded the 2014 SSW Honorary Alumna Award by the Smith College School for Social Work Alumni Association Executive Committee.


Dean Yoshioka to host welcome reception and tour for new students

Dean Yoshioka will host a welcome reception and campus tour for students on Wednesday, April 15, 2015. The tour will begin at 3:30pm in Lilly Hall's reception area (Lilly 101). (Students, please see your email for a link to register online for the tour.)Promotional image including event title and image of Dean Yoshioka socializing with students at the 2014 Dean's welcome reception The reception will be held 5-6:30pm in the Neilson Browsing Room of Smith College's Neilson Library.

This event is for SSW students and faculty only.

More information:


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Dr. Kathryn Basham moderates panel on "Understanding and Healing War's Deepest Wounds"

On Thursday, April 9, SSW Professor Kathryn Basham will moderate a discussion with three authors who examine war trauma and healing in their work. The panel will feature Robert E. Meagher (author of "Killing from the Inside Out: Moral injury and just war"), Mark I. Nickerson (co-author of "The Wounds Within: A Veteran, a PTSD therapist, and a nation unprepared"), and Edward Tick (author of "Warrior's Return: Restoring the soul after war"). The participants will discuss the challenges of reintegration: How can war Veterans come back whole to themselves, their families, and their community?

This free event is for Veterans, military families, helping professionals and the general public. It will take place at Smith College in Seelye Hall, Room 106, at 7pm.

Presented by Smith College School for Social Work and the Veterans Education Project.

More information:

 

 


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Dean Yoshioka hosts alumni/student lunch at AAPCSW Conference 2015

On Friday, March 13, 2015, Dean Yoshioka hosted a lunch for alumni and students at the American Association for Psychoanalysis in Clinical Social Work (AAPCSW) conference in Durham, North Carolina. Dean Yoshioka with alumni and students at the SSW lunch at the AAPCSW conference in Durham, NC. Photo credit: Kevin Smith

The dean was joined by Dawn Faucher, SSW director of alumni affairs and development, and Pat Gilbert, administrator coordinator for the Office of Alumni Affairs and Development, as well as faculty members Dr. Kathryn Basham and Dr. Joan Berzoff.

Dean Yoshioka with alumni and students at the SSW lunch at the AAPCSW conference in Durham, NC. Photo credit: Kevin SmithThe lunch was well-attended and provided an opportunity for alumni and students to become acqainted with Dean Yoshioka, while also making connections with one another as members of the SSW community at-large.


2015 Winter Faculty Meeting

The 2015 Winter Faculty Meeting took place in the Smith College Campus Center on Friday, February 6. The annual event brings together resident faculty, adjunct instructors, and advisers for orientation to School policies, professional development, and connection with colleagues.

Associate Dean Peggy O'Neill addresses the 2015 Winter Faculty Meeting

The morning featured a welcome by Dean Marianne Yoshioka and an overview by Associate Dean Peggy O'Neill, followed by training sessions on topics such as campus safety, accessibility, and privacy policies.

SSW faculty members enjoy lunch in the Smith College Campus CenterA delicious lunch was catered by Smith College dining services. The hour-long break provided an opportunity for faculty members to get to know one another and catch up with colleagues.

Dean Marianne Yoshioka addresses the 2015 Winter Faculty MeetingDean Yoshioka began the afternoon session with an overview of her vision for the School, which builds on its solid foundation as a leading clinical social work school that is commited to social justice.

Small group discussions allowed faculty members an opportunity to explore that vision and how it can be brought to fruition.

The day was capped with meetings of faculty working in the various Sequences.

Faculty at the 2015 Winter Faculty Meeting

Summer Student Guide

   PREVIEW!

A preview of the 2015 Summer Student Guide (smith.edu/ssw/summer-student-guide) is now available. It offers information for students and families planning for summer at SSW, including some of the key academic calendar dates and travel recommendations.

Go to: Summer Student Guide

On January 26, Dean Marianne Yoshioka presented a lecture about the cultural context of domestic violence, one of her areas of professional research and expertise.

Dr. Josh Miller introducing Dean YoshiokaDean Yoshioka was introduced by Dr. Josh Miller.

"It is difficult for a dean to continue their scholarship, but Marianne Yoshioka is very much a scholar," said Miller.

Dean Yoshioka giving a lecture on January 26, 2015Dean Yoshioka spoke about the broad range of social work contexts in which domestic violence can be a factor. She went on to elaborate on a number of ways in which cultural origin and identity can play a role in domestic violence and the ways in which victims seek or refuse help from service providers.

Former Dean Ann Hartman seated beside Dawn Faucher and greeted by Associate Dean Irene Rodriguez-Martin, at Dean Yoshioka's lecture on January 26, 2015The lecture was attended by Smith College President Kathleen McCartney, Smith College and SSW faculty, and members of the SSW community. Among the attendees was former Dean Ann Hartman, who led SSW from 1986 to 1994.

The dean's lecture was part of the New Chaired Professors lecture series sponsored by the President of Smith College. The series features new chaired professors and provides an opportunity for the college community to be introduced to the new faculty members and their areas of academic research.


SSW presents at SSWR 2015

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In January, the School for Social Work joined colleagues at the annual Society for Social Work and Research conference in New Orleans. Presenters included SSW resident faculty members, adjunct lecturers, alumni, and current students. Highlights included:

  • Dr. Jim Drisko participated in the "Meet the Scientist Luncheon"
  • Dr. Peggy O'Neill presented "Social Support and Depression: An Evaluation of Motherwoman Peer Support Groups for Mothers with Postpartum Depression"
  • Dr. Hye-Kyung Kang presented "Effects of Community Violence, Discrimination and Racial Identity on African American Juvenile Delinquency"
  • Dr. Hannah Karpman presented "Factors Predicting Entry into Medicaid Funded Wraparound Care "
  • Dr. Joan Berzoff presented (with adjunct lecturer David Byers) "Social Work Under Occupation: The Palestinian Student Perspective"

More information: SSWR Annual Conference 2015.