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Mon - Fri: 8 am - 4:30 pm

Call (413) 585-7960

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Mon - Fri: 8 am - 4:30 pm

Call (413) 585-7950

Professional Education

Mon - Fri: 8 am - 4:30 pm

Call (413) 585-7970

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June Professional Education Seminars

Thursday, June 27, 2019

Course Description

This course will review our current “best practices” approach to the assessment and treatment of adolescents who have engaged in sexually abusive behavior, reflecting an increasingly contemporary model that is developmental- and contextually-sensitive, rehabilitative in nature, and thus strength-based and strength-building, and relational in its conceptualization and delivery of treatment. We’ll discuss a brief history of the field and how it has and continues to evolve, an overview and critique of juvenile sexual risk assessment and a contemporary approach to risk assessment, including the evidence about effectiveness of juvenile sexual risk assessment and the base rate for juvenile sexual recidivism, and evolving thoughts about case management and treatment, and what does or does not makes treatment work. The day will be largely didactic, but student participation and interaction is encouraged, and we’ll discuss one case study, as well as responding to participant questions and comments.

Instructor Bio

Phil Rich trains and consults nationally and internationally, specializing in work with sexually abusive youth. He has extensive field and research experience and is the author of four books and multiple chapters and articles that address the assessment and treatment of sexually abusive youth, and a series of workbooks for sexually abusive youth. He is a fellow and board member of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, and Chair of the ATSA Juvenile Practice Committee.

Learning Objectives

  • Discover the elements of contemporary treatment for sexually abusive youth.
  • Describe the statistical accuracy of juvenile sexual risk assessment instruments.
  • Identify the likelihood and base rate of juvenile sexual recidivism.

Bibliography

  • Rich. P. (2009). Juvenile sexual offenders: A comprehensive guide to risk evaluation. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Rich, P. (2011). Understanding juvenile sexual offenders: Assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation (2nd. ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Rich, P. (2014, October). Assessment of risk for sexual re-offense in juveniles who commit sexual offenses. In Sex Offender Management Assessment and Planning Initiative. Washington, DC: National Criminal Justice Association, Office of Justice Programs (SMART), U.S. Department of Justice. http://www.smart.gov/SOMAPI/sec2/ch4_risk.html

Course description

To work with troubled and traumatized youth, it is crucial for therapists to first foster their own capacity for self-awareness and connection. It is not easy, especially when our young clients’ extreme reactions—ranging from distressed arousal to frozen shutting down—can trigger our own dysregulated responses. For many of these adolescents, a strong attachment to self-medication poses an extra layer of challenge. We need somehow to convince them that the hard work of reliable human relationships can be more rewarding than an easy high. In this presentation, you’ll discover how to use the “four Ms” of mirroring, mentalization, mindfulness, and modulation to stay present, get unhooked, and provide corrective relational experiences.

 

Instructor Bio

Martha B. Straus, Ph.D. is a professor in the Department of Clinical Psychology at Antioch University New England Graduate School in Keene, New Hampshire, and adjunct instructor in psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School. She maintains a small private practice in Brattleboro, VT. She is the author of numerous articles and five books including, most recently, Treating Trauma in Adolescents: Development, Attachment, and the Therapeutic Relationship.
 

Learning Objectives

  • Explore specific adolescent attachment styles that may interact with and trigger your own.
  • Describe addictive behavior and treatment through the lens of attachment theory.
  • Utilize the React, Reflect, and Respond approach to provide corrective relational experiences.
  • Understand the four M’s—mirroring, mentalizing, mindfulness, and modulation—to increase connection and mood regulation.
  • Make use of adult validation, unflinching empathy, selective self-disclosure, and strategic enactments to bring traumatized teens back into relationships with themselves and with you.
     

Bibliography

  • Ford, J., & Courtois, C. (Eds.). (2013). Treating complex traumatic stress disorders in children and adolescents: Scientific foundations and therapeutic models. NY: Guilford.
  • Lewis, T., Amini, F., & Lannon, R. (2001). A general theory of love. NY:
  • Random House.
  • Straus, M. (2017). Treating trauma in adolescents: Development, attachment, and the therapeutic relationship. New York: Guilford.
  • Van der Kolk (2014). The body keeps the score: Brain, mind and body in the healing of trauma. New York: Viking Penguin.
  • Wallin, D. (2007). Attachment in psychotherapy. NY: Guilford.
     

Course Description

There is much research that supports the fact that LGBTQ and other sexual minorities experience a higher level of stress and subsequent mental health and addiction disparities compared to those individuals who are of the sexual majority. Despite this fact, however, many practitioners report feeling ill-equipped and lacking the competence to treat this population. This course will prepare the addiction and mental health practitioner with accurately recognizing, assessing, and treating individuals who identify as LGBTQIA who are struggling with substance abuse and related problems. Special attention will be paid to the comprehension of sexuality self-identifier terms, culturally-specific risk and etiological factors, and evidence-based culturally-competent treatment considerations. Participants will have the opportunity to examine their own socialization around sexuality, and how it has impacted them personally and professionally up until present day. Insight strategies will allow participants to explore the importance of examining function across domains of functioning, including sexuality and sexual identity. Intersectionalities will also be explored as they relate to other marginalized populations.

Instructor Bio

Katherine Glick is a licensed professional counselor (PA, NJ) and a licensed clinical alcohol and drug counselor (NJ), as well as a certified and approved clinical supervisor (ACS, CCS). Her professional background includes 10 years of clinical experience working in addiction treatment and psychiatric rehabilitation. She opened her private practice in 2013, specializing in the holistic and integrative treatment of clinical mental health and behavioral disorders, as well as health counseling, coaching and psychotherapy. She has taught in undergraduate, graduate, and professional development educational programs since 2013.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the epidemiology and risk factors of substance abuse among the LGBTQIA population.
  • Be able to identify key terms and substance use trends in the LGBTQIA population.
  • Understand the characteristics and life experiences of LGBTQIA individuals and how they connect and correlate to substance use and abuse.
  • Develop and utilize culturally-competent practices to assist LGBTQIA clients with resolving problems and challenges that compromise their recovery.

 

Bibliography

  • Feinstein, B. A., Dyar, C., & London, B. (2017). Are outness and community involvement risk or protective factors for alcohol and drug abuse among sexual minority women?. Archives Of Sexual Behavior, 46(5), 1411-1423. doi:10.1007/s10508-016-0790-7
  • Huebner, D. M., Thoma, B. C., & Neilands, T. B. (2015). School victimization and substance use among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender adolescents. Prevention Science, 16(5), 734-743. doi:10.1007/s11121-014-0507-x
  • Livingston, N. A., Flentje, A., Heck, N. C., Szalda-Petree, A., & Cochran, B. N. (2017). Ecological momentary assessment of daily discrimination experiences and nicotine, alcohol, and drug use among sexual and gender minority individuals. Journal Of Consulting And Clinical Psychology, 85(12), 1131-1143. doi:10.1037/ccp0000252
  • Puckett, J. A., Mereish, E. H., Levitt, H. M., Horne, S. G., & Hayes-Skelton, S. A. (2018). Internalized heterosexism and psychological distress: The moderating effects of decentering. Stigma And Health, 3(1), 9-15. doi:10.1037/sah0000065
  • Talley, A. E., Gilbert, P. A., Mitchell, J., Goldbach, J., Marshall, B. L., & Kaysen, D. (2016). Addressing gaps on risk and resilience factors for alcohol use outcomes in sexual and gender minority populations. Drug And Alcohol Review, 35(4), 484-493. doi:10.1111/dar.12387

Course description

This course will provide an orientation to the Smith College School for Social Work and address the general principals of supervision with a particular focus on the development of the supervisory relationship.  The course will concentrate on assessment of supervisory/student teaching/learning styles, principles of adult learning, stages of clinical learning, boundaries within the supervisory relationship, the use of educational learning tools including process recordings/role play and the role of evaluation.  The central issues of diversity in the supervisory process and meeting the needs of the agency, supervisor and students will also become major areas of attention.  The format will include mini lecture, video material, case vignette(s) and group discussion.  Participants are encouraged to bring examples and dilemmas from their own experience.  (This course is ONLY open to those supervising for Smith College School for Social Work students)

 

Intructor Bio

Katya Cerar, Ph.D., LICSW, directs the Franklin county adult community services and the Prevention and Treatment from Early Psychosis (PREP) Program at ServiceNet in western Massachusetts and supervises teams of staff providing day treatment, outreach and residential services. Cerar has worked in residential, forensic and outpatient settings; and has provided consultation to agencies in a number of areas. Cerar also teaches, supervises and advises social work students locally.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Define the tasks and roles of the primary supervisor.
  • Describe the primary factors which promote learning within the supervision relationship.
  • Explain how  to assess students’ learning needs.
  • Demonstrate increased awareness of diversity and its role in the supervisory relationship.
  • Summarize supervisory learning tools and the timing of their use according to the developmental learning needs of the student.

Bibliography

  • Akamatsue, A. (2002)  Cultural Racism – The air we breathe.  The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work. No. 4.
  • Bennett, S. and Saks, L. (2006) A conceptual application of attachment theory and research to the social work student-field instructor supervisory relationship. Journal of Social Word Education, vol. 42.3, pp 669-682
  • Bogo, M. et al (2006) Beyond competencies: field instructors’ descriptions of student performance. Journal of Social Work Education, vol. 42.3 pp 579-593
  • Deal, K.  (2002)  Modifying field Instructors Supervisory Approach Using Stage Models of Student Development. Journal of Teaching in Social Work. Vol 22

Note: This course offers CE Credits for Social Workers only. 

Friday, June 28, 2019

The 2019 conference will bring together practitioners and scholars from around the country to explore Healing and Resilience: Theory, Evidence and Excellence in Clinical Practice.  

Learn more about the conference

Saturday, June 29, 2019

Course Description

Who couldn’t use a refresher course on how to increase proficiency in listening and intervention skill sets? Regardless of your therapeutic orientation or your level of experience, conceptualizing how parts of the person connect or do not connect to form an integrated, cohered self is an acquired skill that deepens and improves over time.

This course is designed to help clinicians identify how early childhood attachment experiences and/or failures are directly connected to the development of one’s beliefs, values, motivation, and assumptions about the self in the world and self-in-relationship to others. Participants will review techniques such as, moment-to-moment tracking, part-whole analysis, and listening to the subtle nuance of langue to help us uncover hidden feelings that lie beneath the surface of the therapeutic exchange. Through tracking these process dynamics, participants will be shown how to stay more aligned with the client’s experience in the present, thus creating a more secure therapeutic holding environment.

The structure of this course will be a combination of lecture, group discussion, and pre-recorded videotaped session vignettes as well as therapist-client process recordings. Through these examples, participants will be shown how even minor disappointments can trigger feelings of shame, micro-dissociative ruptures, and possible negative transferential responses on the part of our clients. We will discuss and practice how to catch and repair minor ruptures that occur throughout the treatment process, thus preserving and strengthening the therapeutic relationship.

Instructor Bio

Patricia Gianotti, Psy.D., is a psychologist and managing partner of Woodland Psychological Services, a private group practice in North Hampton, NH. Her areas of specialization center on attachment difficulties associated with trauma, shame, and narcissistic injury. Gianotti is the co-author of Listening with Purpose: Entry Points into Shame and Narcissistic Vulnerability, Jason Aronson, 2012, and Uncovering the Resilient Core: A Workbook on the Treatment of Shame, Narcissistic Defenses, and Emerging Authenticity, Routledge 2017. She had the privilege of instructing CEU Summer Courses at Smith College for the past six years.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Define the importance of part-whole analysis as an assessment and intervention technique.
  • Explain how misattunements on the part of the therapist can trigger memories of early attachment failures.
  • Demonstrate moment-to-moment tracking.
  • Give examples of a range of micro-dissociative episodes that may occur within treatment.

 

Bibliography

  • Danielian J., Gianotti, P. (2012). Listening with Purpose: Entry Points into Shame and Narcissistic Vulnerability. Lanham: Jason Aronson
  • DeYoung, P. (2015). Understanding and Treating Chronic Shame. New York: Routledge.
  • Gianotti, P, & Danielian, J. (2017) Uncovering the Resilient Core: A Workbook on the Treatment of Narcissistic Defenses, Shame, and Emerging Authenticity. New York: Routledge.
  • Howell, E. F. (2005). The Dissociative Mind. New York: Routledge.
  • Wachtel, P. L. (2011). Therapeutic Communication: Knowing what to Say When. New York: Guilford.

Course Description

This course will address questions such as: What constitutes an affair - sexual intercourse? Sexting? What makes cyber-relationships so seductive? When is cybersex a sign of sexual addiction? Is there a difference between secrecy and privacy in committed relationships? Is there room for secrets in couples therapy and, if so, how can therapists create a safe place for each partner's rigorous honesty and self-scrutiny? When is it best to divulge an affair and when is best to keep it a secret? How can therapists help hurt partners absorb the trauma of infidelity and feel less crazy and alone? How can therapists help both partners take a fair share of responsibility for the damage they caused and earn forgiveness? What breeds intimacy and passion: forbidden or secure attachments? How do feelings of love deceive as much as they inform, and what is the role of neurochemistry in driving these feelings? How do attributes which originally attracted us to our partner become targets of our contempt? How can we help partners decipher the meaning of an affair in ways that shed light on their vulnerabilities, longings, and unresolved traumatic injuries? How can this meaning be used to grow the marriage? After an affair, is it possible to heal without forgiving? Is it possible to forgive without reconciling with the unfaithful partner? What concrete steps can partners take to foster genuine forgiveness? What concrete exercises help couples rekindle trust and erotic intimacy after an affair? How can partners work to reconcile and recommit, even when they don't yet feel very loved or loving?

Instructor Bio

Janis Abrahms Spring, Ph.D., ABPP, is author of After the Affair and How Can I Forgive You? In private practice for 40 years, she received the CPA's award for distinguished contribution to the practice of psychology and the CAMFT's award for distinguished family service. Board certified in clinical psychology, she served as a clinical supervisor in Yale University's psychology department. www.janisaspring.com

Learning Objectives

  • Describe an open secrets policy which helps therapists and partners manage secrets in couples therapy.
  • Specify what makes cybersex so appealing and addictive.
  • Explain how an understanding of contributing factors reduces a couple's vulnerability to future affairs.
  • Describe a trust-building exercise that fosters the connection between partners after an affair in cyberspace and in the flesh.
     

Bibliography

  • Spring, Janis Abrahms. (2012). After the Affair: Healing the Pain and Rebuilding Trust When a Partner Has Been Unfaithful. New York: HarperCollins.
  • Spring, Janis Abrahms and Spring, Michael. (2005). How Can I Forgive You? The Courage to Forgive, The Freedom Not To. New York: HarperCollins
  • Spring, Janis Abrahms. (2010). Life with Pop: Lessons on Caring for an Aging Parent. New York: Avery Penguin.
  • Lerner, Harriet. (2017). Why Won’t You Apologize: Healing Big Betrayals and Everyday Hurts.
  • Weiner-Davis, Michelle. (2017). Healing from Infidelity: The Divorce Busting Guide to Rebuilding After an Affair.

 

Course Description

Research indicates that many instances of premature therapy dropout are due to therapist actions or inactions within the therapeutic relationship and process. This course will detail the research evidence on variables affecting premature dropout and poor outcomes in psychotherapy. Elements of the therapeutic role and process, from intake through termination, will be discussed with specific attention paid to predictors of premature termination. Strategies for reducing client dropout will be discussed and applied to case examples, and participants will have the opportunity to try out new skills to navigate through therapeutic ruptures and other premature dropout risk factors.

 

Instructor Bio

Katherine Glick is a licensed professional counselor (PA, NJ) and a licensed clinical alcohol and drug counselor (NJ), as well as a certified and approved clinical supervisor (ACS, CCS). Her professional background includes 10 years of clinical experience working in addiction treatment and psychiatric rehabilitation. She opened her private practice in 2013, specializing in the holistic and integrative treatment of clinical mental health and behavioral disorders, as well as health counseling, coaching and psychotherapy. She has taught in undergraduate, graduate, and professional development educational programs since 2013.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the variables that often lead to premature termination in psychotherapy.
  • Apply knowledge and therapeutic bonding skills to enhance the quality of therapeutic relationships with clients.
  • Explain preventative strategies that reduce risk for premature dropout and practice skills to effectively engage clients and improve client outcomes.

 

Bibliography

  • Chen, R., Piercy, F. P., Huang, W., Jaramillo-Sierra, A. L., Karimi, H., Chang, W., & ... Antonio, A. (2017). A cross-national study of therapists’ perceptions and experiences of premature dropout from therapy. Journal Of Family Psychotherapy, 28(3), 269-284. doi:10.1080/08975353.2017.1343067
  • Gurak, K. K., Weisman de Mamani, A., & Ironson, G. (2017). Does religiosity predict attrition from a culturally-informed family treatment for schizophrenia that targets religious coping?. Journal Of Consulting And Clinical Psychology, 85(10), 937-949. doi:10.1037/ccp0000234
  • Kottler, J. A. (2015). The therapist in the real world: What you never learn in graduate school (but really need to know). New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company Ltd.
  • Swift, J.K. & Greenberg, R.P. (2015). Premature termination in psychotherapy: Strategies for engaging clients and improving outcomes. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Swift, J. K., & Greenberg, R. P. (2014). A treatment by disorder meta-analysis of dropout from psychotherapy. Journal Of Psychotherapy Integration, 24(3), 193-207. doi:10.1037/a0037512

Course Description:

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an evidenced-based practice that came out of the addictions field and is applicable to a wide range of presenting problems. It is currently used in the health care, mental health and substance abuse/recovery fields and is gaining increasing recognition for its efficacy, broad application and humanistic approach. During Motivational Interviewing conversations, the practitioner engages the client in a guided dialogue meant to uncover and heighten ambivalence around a target behavior or issue, aid the client in resolving their ambivalence, and ultimately identify a change plan that supports the client’s self-definition of health. MI employs a core set of skills, used within an overarching framework or "spirit," which includes respect, promotion of autonomy and personal choice, collaboration, acceptance, compassion/empathy, and evocation. This highly interactive and participatory two-day course will offer the basics of Motivational Interviewing, with emphasis on exploring and understanding the spirit of MI and learning and practicing the core skills through “real” plays, demonstrations, exercises and case examples. Participants new to MI will leave with effective tools, and those already familiar will increase their confidence and repertoire. 

 

Instructor Bio

Sara Schieffelin, LICSW, a 2008 Smith College School for Social Work alumna, has worked with children, adolescents, families and adults in Massachusetts, Colorado and Thailand. She is currently the Director of Psychological Counseling Services at the Williston Northampton School, and has a private practice. Schieffelin is a member of the international organization Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) and has been teaching MI since 2013. She lives with her husband and son in Florence, Mass. 

Learning objectives:

  • Define the theoretical framework of Motivational Interviewing
  • Identify approaches to improve empathy skills
  • Demonstrate the core skills of Motivational Interviewing
  • State methods to identify and prompt client/patient change talk
  • Describe how to respond effectively to resistance
  • Demonstrate the structure of a Motivational Interviewing conversation and how to move a client from sustain  talk toward change talk using the core skills of MI

Bibliography:

  • Levounis, P., Arnaout, B. and Marienfeld, C. (2017). Motivational Interviewing for Clinical Practice. Arlington, Virginia: American Psychiatric Association Publishing.   
  • Miller, W.R. (2018). Listening Well: The Art of Empathic Understanding. Eugene, Oregon: WIPF & Stock
  • Miller, W. R. and Rollnick, S. (2013). Motivational Interviewing: Helping People Change, 3rd Edition. New York, NY: The Guilford Press. 
  • Naar-King, S. and Suarez, Mariann (2011). Motivational Interviewing with Adolescents and Young Adults. New York, NY: The Guilford Press. 
  • Rollnick, R., Kaplan, S. and Rutschman, R. (2016). Motivational Interviewing in Schools. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
  • Rosengren, David B. (2017). Building Motivational Interviewing Skills: A Practitioner Workbook. 2nd Edition. New York, NY: The Guilford Press. 

 

Sunday, June 30, 2019

Course Description

When we are stressed or traumatized our nervous system can becomes stuck in a fight or flight state resulting in high blood pressure, increased heart rate, hyper-vigilance, anxiety, perceptions of challenge or danger and disorganized cognitive processing. For victims of trauma, we call this post-traumatic stress; for helping professionals working with traumatized clients, we call this vicarious traumatization. When traumatized, both clients and helping professionals can experience difficulties functioning in their daily lives. Vicarious traumatization can also negatively impact quality and effectiveness of client care. Learn how the nervous system becomes dysregulated and research related to how simple, easy to learn and teach energy practices can regulate the nervous system and build resilience. Experience and practice techniques from the field of energy medicine and energy psychology. These techniques can be used and practiced by social workers during and after work as self-care and can be used and taught to their clients for both treatment and self-help.

 

Instructor Bio

Rachel Michaelsen, LCSW, Diplomat in Comprehensive Energy Psychology, has been teaching energy medicine and energy psychology for over 15 years to mental-health and social-services providers to build resilience and address their own stress and trauma as well as that of their clients. Rachel uses energy medicine and energy psychology methods with adolescents and adults in her private practice in Berkeley, CA. Rachel is the Chair of the Association of Comprehensive Energy Psychology (ACEP) Humanitarian Committee.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Articulate how the nervous system responds to stress.
  • Explain how energy practices create nervous system regulation.
  • Identify at least three signs of vicarious traumatization in themselves or a colleague or supervisee.
  • Identify at least three ways vicarious traumatization can negatively impact therapeutic interventions.
  • Demonstrate and teach at least three energy medicine techniques.
  • Demonstrate and teach Trauma Tapping Technique.

Bibliography

  • Acupuncture, the limbic system, and the anticorrelated networks of the brain by Hui, Marina, Liu, Rosen and Kwong in Autonomic Neruoscience: Basic and Clinical Vol. 157, Issues 1-2, Pp. 81-90. October 28, 2010
  • Clond, M. (2016). Emotional Freedom Techniques for anxiety: A systematic review with metaanalysis. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease J Nerv Ment Dis. 2016 Feb 18. [Epub ahead of print].
  • Kalla, M. & Stapleton, P. (2016). How Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) may be utilizing memory reconsolidation mechanisms for therapeutic change in neuropsychiatric disorders such as PTSD and phobia: A proposed model. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing. Resolving Yesterday: First Aid for Stress and Trauma with TTT by Gunilla Hamne and Ulf Sandstrom

Course Description

As more and more transgender children, youth, and adults are coming out and seeking support, we find ourselves interacting with clients who use a wide range of names and pronouns, including some that are different from what we might expect. We are also encountering all sorts of new terminology, such as "nonbinary," "gender expression," "cisgender," etc. What does it all mean? How do we make sure that we are being respectful? How do our own experiences with gender come up for us as we interact with others? What are some of the unique mental health needs held by members of this population? What can clinicians do to create a truly welcoming practice for transgender clients?

This interactive, fun and informative session will be an introduction to transgender terminology, identity and best practices for interacting with transgender and gender nonconforming community members, as well as a chance to explore our own genders and experiences. Bring your questions, your experiences and your own identities!

 

Instructor Bio

Tobias K. Davis (Toby) is a transgender educator, activist and playwright who uses theatre, writing and teaching to advocate for a gender-inclusive society. Davis has supported colleges, congregations and communities in developing trans-inclusive policies and practices for almost 20 years. He holds an M.Ed. in social justice education and is the assistant director of admission at the Smith College School for Social Work.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Define key concepts surrounding gender identity.
  • Identify concrete ways to support transgender clients in their practices.
  • Describe how transgender oppression manifests on individual, institutional and cultural levels.
  • Examine their own gender identities and how they impact the clinical relationship.

 

Bibliography

  • Adams, M., Bell, L. A., & Griffin, P. (Eds.). (2007). Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice. Routledge.
  • James, S. E., & Herman, J. (2017). The Report of the 2015 US Transgender Survey: Executive Summary. National Center for Transgender Equality.
  • Ophelian, A. (2009). Diagnosing difference [DVD]. San Francisco, CA: Floating Ophelia Productions.
  • Shlasko, D. (2017). Trans Allyship Workbook: Building skills to support trans people in our lives (2nd ed.). (n.p.): Think Again Training.

Course Description

Expressive writing is a powerful, creative therapeutic technique that has proved effective and efficient in individual and group therapy, in a range of clinical settings from private practices to hospitals and nursing homes. Expressive writing lives in the creative space between journal writing and such artistic writing forms as poetry and narrative. Its purpose is therapeutic, both healing and generative. The benefits of expressive writing have been researched by Dr. James Pennebaker and others, who present evidence that it can improve health, cognition and social functioning. It has been found to be effective across cultures, genders and age, underscoring the universality of writing and confirming what we know instinctively to be its healing power.

This 6-hour course will offer a comprehensive overview of expressive writing for both clinicians new to its practice or those who want to expand its use in their work. We will briefly discuss the evolution and theoretical basis of expressive writing. Therapeutic writing techniques and guidelines for their use will be presented, including James Pennebaker's research protocol and case material.

There will be time for experiential writing and discussion of participants' cases. An extensive bibliography of expressive writing resources, including books, websites and programs will be presented. Participants will emerge with an appreciation for the power of writing and the creative energy it brings to therapeutic work.

 

 

Instructor Bio

Mary C. Mueller, LICSW is in private practice in Providence, RI, where she sees adults, couples and college students. She introduced expressive writing to her practice in 2003 and has used it since in individual therapy and groups. She offers training workshops for clinicians, in addition to expressive writing retreats. She writes poetry and essays.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe basic therapeutic functions of expressive writing and guidelines for their use.
  • Identify basic expressive writing techniques and guidelines for their application.
  • Discover the research protocol and work of Dr. James Pennebaker and its role in expressive writing.
  • Give examples of expressive writing books, websites and resources.

Bibliography

 

  • Adams, Kathleen. 1998. The Way of the Journal. A Journal Workbook for Healing. Baltimore: The Sidran Press.
  • Bolton, Gillie. Howlett, Stephanie. Lago, Colin. Wright, Jeannie K. Editors. 2004. Writing Cures: An Introductory Handbook of writing in counseling and therapy. London and New York: Routledge Taylor & Frances Group.
  • Borkin, Susan. 2014. The Healing Power of Writing: A Therapist's Guide to Using Journaling with Clients. New York and London. W.W. Norton & Company.
  • Flarherty, Alice W. 2004. The Midnight Disease. The Drive to Write, Writer's Block, and the Creative Brain. Houghton Mifflin Company.
  • Lepore, Stephen J. & Smyth, Joshua, M. 2002. The Writing Cure: How Expressive Writing Promotes Health and Emotional Well-Being. Washington D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Course Description:

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an evidenced-based practice that came out of the addictions field and is applicable to a wide range of presenting problems. It is currently used in the health care, mental health and substance abuse/recovery fields and is gaining increasing recognition for its efficacy, broad application and humanistic approach. During Motivational Interviewing conversations, the practitioner engages the client in a guided dialogue meant to uncover and heighten ambivalence around a target behavior or issue, aid the client in resolving their ambivalence, and ultimately identify a change plan that supports the client’s self-definition of health. MI employs a core set of skills, used within an overarching framework or "spirit," which includes respect, promotion of autonomy and personal choice, collaboration, acceptance, compassion/empathy, and evocation. This highly interactive and participatory two-day course will offer the basics of Motivational Interviewing, with emphasis on exploring and understanding the spirit of MI and learning and practicing the core skills through “real” plays, demonstrations, exercises and case examples. Participants new to MI will leave with effective tools, and those already familiar will increase their confidence and repertoire. 

 

Instructor Bio

Sara Schieffelin, LICSW, a 2008 Smith College School for Social Work alumna, has worked with children, adolescents, families and adults in Massachusetts, Colorado and Thailand. She is currently the Director of Psychological Counseling Services at the Williston Northampton School, and has a private practice. Schieffelin is a member of the international organization Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) and has been teaching MI since 2013. She lives with her husband and son in Florence, Mass. 

Learning objectives:

  • Define the theoretical framework of Motivational Interviewing
  • Identify approaches to improve empathy skills
  • Demonstrate the core skills of Motivational Interviewing
  • State methods to identify and prompt client/patient change talk
  • Describe how to respond effectively to resistance
  • Demonstrate the structure of a Motivational Interviewing conversation and how to move a client from sustain  talk toward change talk using the core skills of MI

Bibliography:

  • Levounis, P., Arnaout, B. and Marienfeld, C. (2017). Motivational Interviewing for Clinical Practice. Arlington, Virginia: American Psychiatric Association Publishing.   
  • Miller, W.R. (2018). Listening Well: The Art of Empathic Understanding. Eugene, Oregon: WIPF & Stock
  • Miller, W. R. and Rollnick, S. (2013). Motivational Interviewing: Helping People Change, 3rd Edition. New York, NY: The Guilford Press. 
  • Naar-King, S. and Suarez, Mariann (2011). Motivational Interviewing with Adolescents and Young Adults. New York, NY: The Guilford Press. 
  • Rollnick, R., Kaplan, S. and Rutschman, R. (2016). Motivational Interviewing in Schools. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
  • Rosengren, David B. (2017). Building Motivational Interviewing Skills: A Practitioner Workbook. 2nd Edition. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.