July Professional Education Seminars

Thursday, July 18, 2019

Course Description

The senior population in the United States is projected to reach 72 million by 2030. About 25% of older adults have some kind of mental health diagnosis. Older women will be an increasing percentage of those seeking mental health services for the coming decade and beyond. Informed practice makes it possible to effectively treat more than 80% of this population and support their ability to continue to contribute to society.

This course presents evidence-based practices for the treatment of anxiety and depression integrated into a treatment model that is sensitive to issues of sexism and ageism. It addresses the central challenge of loss in the lives of aging women and focuses on supporting resiliency and encouraging women toward redefining the way in which meaningful relationships and work continue to center their lives.
 

Instructor Bio

Beth Wechsler is a 1972 graduate of Smith College School for Social Work, where she wrote her thesis on "Depression and the Female Role." She has been a practicing social worker for more than forty-five years and specializes in the treatment of depression in women. A seasoned presenter at national and PESI conferences, she is known for her work, "Counselors in the Classroom: Mainstream Intervention for High-Risk Youth" and "Psychic Events in the Lives of Clinicians and Clients."

 

Learning Objectives

  • Describe how depression in women and men is expressed differently.
  • Explain how to assess anxiety and depression in older women.
  • Recognize how untreated depression can manifest in this population.
  • Identify how to develop a treatment plan with the client that is sensitive to issues of loss and the challenge of social isolation v. participation and contribution.

 

Bibliography

  • Lavretsky, M.D.M.S., Helen R. (2014) Resilience and Aging - Research and practice, Baltimore, MD, Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Miller, M.D., Mark D. and Reynolds, Charles F. (2012) Depression and Anxiety in Later Life, Baltimore, MD, Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, (2011) Evidenced-Based Practices Kit- The Treatment of Depression in Older Adults. www.samsha.gov
  • Friedan, Betty, (2006) The Fountain of Age, New York, NY, Simon and Schuster.

 

Course Description

The focus of this workshop is to improve participants’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes about an aging population; the diversity of sexual backgrounds, experiences and expectations among aging populations; and the implications of common physical and medical conditions of aging as they relate to intimacy and sexuality. We will address the problems and challenges faced by an elderly population during the latter phases of the developmental cycle and include applications to social work. What if we focused on aging not as a loss of but rather as a state of mind to look forward to throughout our lives? With aging comes a slowing down, an openness, authenticity, deep reflection. If we allow ourselves to see our elders as fully human, we will make room for their own sexuality, bringing joy, nurturance, and positive health outcomes to their later years. I propose a new exemplar for the sexual unfolding of older people for whom we are responsible. How we care for our elders can teach the next generation how to care for us.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Identify three of the key areas of comprehensive sexuality education.
  • Describe three challenges of sexuality and aging.
  • Apply one aspect of this workshop into your work as a social worker.
     

Bibliography

  • Adams, M. S., Oye, J., & Parker, T. S. (2003). Sexuality of older adults and the Internet: from sex education to cybersex. Sexual & Relationship Therapy, 18(3), 405.
  • Bauer, M., McAuliffe, L., Nay, R., & Chenco, C. (2013). Sexuality in older adults: Effect of an education intervention on attitudes and beliefs of residential aged care staff. Educational Gerontology, 39(2), 82-91. doi:10.1080/03601277.2012.682953
  • Bennett, J.M. & Bennett, M.J. (2004). Developing intercultural sensitivity: An integrative approach to global and domestic diversity. In D. Landis, J.M. Bennett & M.J. Bennett (Eds.). Handbook of intercultural training, 3rd edition (pp. 147-165). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.
  • Brick, P. (2009). Older, wiser, sexually smarter: 30 sex ed lessons for adults only. Morristown, NJ: Planned Parenthood of Northern New Jersey.
  • DeLamater, J. (2012). Sexual expression in later life: A review and synthesis. Journal of Sex Research, 49(2/3) 125-141. doi:10.1080/00224499.2011.603168
  • Fleishman, M. M. (2018). The science of sexuality and aging: I’ll have what they’re having. Age Right. August, 2018. http://ageright.org/2018/08/07/seniors-sexuality/
  • Fleishman, J. M. (2018). Expressing your emotional and intimacy needs as LGBTQ older adults. National Resource Center on LGBT Aging. May, 2018. www.lgbtagingcenter.org https://www.lgbtagingcenter.org/resources/resource.cfm?r=905 https://www.lgbtagingcenter.org/resources/resource.cfm?r=908
  • Fleishman, J. M. (2017). Sexuality throughout the lifespan: Challenges and findings. Quarterly Journal of the Life Planning Network, 4(6), 25.
  • Fleishman, J. M. (2017). Yes, older lesbians have sexual satisfaction. To Bed or Not to Bed: Sex and the Older Lesbian. Brookline, MA: Boston OLOC and Last Gasp Press.
  • Fleishman, J. M. (2016). Coming of age at the time of Stonewall: Internalized homophobia, sexual communication, resilience, relationship satisfaction, and sexual satisfaction in aging adults in same-sex relationships. (Unpublished dissertation). Widener University, Chester, PA
  • Freedom of Sexual Expression: Dementia and Resident Rights in Long-Term Facilities. Produced by National Alzheimer Center of the Hebrew Home for the Aged at Riverdale by Terra Nova Films. http://terranova.org/ProductDetail.aspx?pid=FOS
  • Price, J. (2011). Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex. Berkeley, CA: Seal Press.
  • Szerlip, M. A., Desalvo, K. B., & Szerlip, H. M. (2005). Predictors of HIV infection in older adults. Journal of Aging & Health, 17(3), 293-304. doi:10.1177/0898264305276298

Course Description

Social acceptance and inclusion are fundamental human needs, yet many people feel they don’t fit in or belong. They may struggle in groups generally or be threatened by specific societal and cultural dynamics. In the traditional one-to-one paradigm of psychotherapy, internalized social messages and cultural struggles are too often overlooked as clinical issues and their impact goes unnoticed. Clinicians are often awkward or fearful about creating a climate that welcomes social identity and cultural experience exploration and instead default to a “color blind” approach. Yet, past and ongoing socially adverse experiences including developmental social trauma, stigmatization, discrimination and marginalization can lead to isolation, invisibility, alienation and otherwise unsatisfying lives.

This workshop will integrate useful insights from the fields of social psychology and social work including the human brain’s tendencies regarding social information processing, ingroup/outgroup effects, social identity formation, internalized social messages, the impact of “isms” and other cultural forces. But the workshop will go beyond concepts and provide clinical methods for engaging clients in ways that are consistent with best practices in cultural competence. Experiential exercises will offer opportunities to test clinical methods and increase participant self-awareness and intervention skills. Memory-based methods for strengthening social identity will be described. Trauma-informed methods for healing the effects of culturally based trauma and adversity while building resilience will be depicted including useful EMDR therapy strategies.

 

Instructor Bio

Mark Nickerson, LICSW, a psychotherapist in Amherst, MA for 30 years, is editor/author of Cultural Competence and Healing Culturally-Based Trauma with EMDR Therapy: Insights, Strategies and Protocols (Springer, 2016) and The Wounds Within (Skyhorse, 2015), an expose on the challenges for war veterans and their families. He is an EMDR Institute Trainer and 2014 EMDRIA Board President. He conducts trainings nationally and internationally on trauma treatment topics including interventions for culturally based trauma and adversity. See culturalcompetenceEMDR.com and markinickerson.com.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Assess the clinical relevance of social and cultural experiences on client wellbeing.
  • List some of the “hard-wired” innate tendencies of the human brain’s social information processing system and the consequences as they inform clinical work.
  • Explain the concept of social identity as a state-based part of the self and its relevance to overall client wellbeing.
  • Utilize strategies to reinforce and build upon positive social and social identity experiences.
  • Describe treatment strategies to reduce or illuminate the impact of internalized impact of social adversity/ trauma including stigmatization and discrimination.
  • Self-reflect upon personal experiences related to social identity, stigma and prejudice.

 

Bibliography

  • Bebet-Martinez, V. & Hong, Y. (Eds.) (2014). The Oxford Handbook of Multicultural Identity. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Nelson, Todd (ed.). Handbook of Prejudice, Stereotyping, and Discrimination, (2009), New York: Psychology Press. 
  • Nelson, Todd (ed.).  Handbook of Prejudice, Stereotyping, and Discrimination, (2009), New York: Psychology Press.  (Collection of twenty-six topic-related chapters by experts in the field of social psychology.)
  • Nickerson, Mark (editor/author). (2017). Cultural Competence and Healing Culturally Based Trauma with EMDR Therapy: Insights, Strategies and Protocols. (2017. New York: Springer. 
  • Shapiro, Francine. (2017). Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing: Basic principles, protocols, and procedures. Third Edition. New York: Guilford. Stanger, Charles (editor). (2000). Stereotypes Sand Prejudice: Essential Readings, Philadelphia: Psychology Press.and Prejudice: Essential Readings, Philadelphia: Psychology Press.

Friday, July 19, 2019

Course Description

This workshop presents the untold voices of children and teens with ADHD as an effective way to assist parents and professionals in thinking differently about the challenges these children face. Dr. Saline explores how listening to and working with the kids diagnosed with ADHD to solve challenges together improves cooperation and success. Based on interviews with dozens of kids and their parents as well as over 25 years of clinical experience, she provides parents, educators and clinicians with extremely helpful insights into how kids honestly think and feel about having ADHD and how to better assist them. She reviews diagnostic and assessment information about ADHD as well as presenting current research and statistics related to prevalence, genetics, co-occurring disorders and neurobiology. She teaches her strength-based approach, "the 5 C's of ADHD parenting" that helps families and educators improve self-control, Compassion, Collaboration, Consistency and Celebration. Dr. Saline presents a variety of helpful and practical solutions to promote less reactivity and more positive behaviors for everyone. She integrates the opinions and reflections from children and teens with ADHD about what pulls them through. Her collaborative approach synthesizes mindfulness, cognitive therapy and positive psychology while teaching effective skills to reduce the stress in the lives of students and families living with ADHD. This presentation will be both didactic and experiential in nature.

 

Instructor Bio

Sharon Saline, Psy.D., clinical psychologist and author of "What Your ADHD Child Wishes You Knew: Working Together to Empower Kids for Success in School and Life," specializes in working with kids, young adults and families living with ADHD, learning disabilities and mental health issues. She lectures, teaches and facilitates workshops internationally on topics such as understanding ADHD, executive functioning, different kinds of learners and the teen brain.

 

Learning Objectives
 

  • Identify the biological, behavioral and emotional factors related to ADHD and executive functioning skills.
  • Examine current research on ADHD and executive functioning including medical and non-medical treatment options.
  • Discuss how co-existing disorders, learning disabilities, trauma and substance abuse affect ADHD and executive functioning skills in children and teens.
  • Define executive functioning skills and use effective, collaborative strategies for improving them.
  • Implement practical and useful treatment interventions for reducing conflict and improving cooperation with children, teens and their families living with ADHD.
  • Create strategies that promote successful professional collaboration with physicians, school personnel and tutors related to these issues.

 

Bibliography

  • Brown, T. E. (2013). A new understanding of ADHD in children and adults executive function impairments. New York: Routledge.
  • Brown, T.E. (2014). Smart but Stuck: Emotions in teens and adults with ADHD. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Bunford, N., Evans, S. W., & Wymbs, F. (2015). ADHD and Emotion Dysregulation Among Children and Adolescents. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 18(3), 185–217.
  • Dawson, P. & Guare, R. (2010). Executive skills in children and adolescents: A practical guide to assessment and intervention (second edition). New York: Guilford.
  • Dupaul, G. J., Gormley, M. J., & Laracy, S. D. (2012). Comorbidity of LD and ADHD. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 46(1), 43-51. doi:10.1177/0022219412464351
  • Ollendick, T.H., Greene, R.W., Fraire, M.G., Austin, K.E., Halldorsdottir, T., Allen, K.B., Jarrett, M.E., Lewis, K.M., Whitmore, M.J., & Wolff, J.C. (2015). Parent Management Training (PMT) and Collaborative & Proactive Solutions (CPS) in the treatment of oppositional defiant disorder in youth: A randomized control trial. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 9, 1-14.
  • Shaw, P., Eckstrand, W., Sharp, J., Blumenthal, J., Lerch, P., Greenstein, D., Clasen, L., Evans, A., Giedd, J. & Rapoport, J. L. (2007). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is characterized by a delay in cortical maturation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104(49), 19649-19654.
  • Woltering, S., Lishak, V., Hodgson, N., Granic, I., & Zelazo, P. D. (2015). Executive function in children with externalizing and comorbid internalizing behavior problems. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 57(1), 30-38. doi:10.1111/jcpp.12428

 

Course Description

Social Work was born in the United States as a social justice movement designed to ensure inclusion and wellness. Today, social work in public practice is faced with the gentrification of the field and the neutralization of its core founding concept of the person in the environment. Evidence of this has been in the expropriation of language from industry such as productivity, efficiency and deliverables and the focus on specialization over collaboration. As such human beings are divided into their component parts and services plans are designated to fix each part. Social work, therefore, is more often is used as an adjective rather than a professional practice.

A movement toward trauma-informed systems and care has developed that provides an opportunity for Social Workers to reclaim and reimagine the clinical, social and organizational principles embedded in the foundation of Social Work practice.

This presentation will look at the role of social work in direct treatment (micro), clinical supervision and program leadership(mezzo), and systems change (macro) within a trauma-informed system. Building on Attachment, relational and systems theories within the context of a social justice and racial and cultural equity perspective, the presenters will focus on two examples of clinical and organizational change in their own work within two large systems of care.

The presentation will utilize multiple learning modes including some didactic, case studies, video, large group and small group activities as well as a focus on individual commitment to change of the participants.

 

Instructor Bio

Dr. Ken Epstein is a clinician, leadership coach and organizational change consultant. He directed the Children, Youth and Family ’System of Care for San Francisco Department of Public Health. He developed and lead the vision and implementation of Trauma-Informed Systems which has become an organizational promising practice and has been spotlighted by SAMHSA. Dr. Epstein received his Social Work and Ph.D. from the University of California Berkeley and aPh.D.D from Smith College.

Dr. Katy Davis is the Director of Trauma-Informed Care for the Women’s HIV Program (WHP) at UCSF and is a licensed clinical social worker. Her current role is to develop and implement a model of trauma-informed health care at WHP. She is trained as a trauma therapist and has provided group and individual therapy to HIV-positive women since 2003. She received her PhD in clinical social work from Smith College School for Social Work in 2013.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Understand trauma-informed care as a movement that began with the inception of the social work profession and how it has developed over time.
  • Learn how to apply and integrate attachment, relational and systems theories into clinical work with traumatized clients (micro), clinical supervision (mezzo) as well as organizational culture change (macro) as part of a larger team, program, or system of care.
  • Learn how trauma-informed care acknowledges and addresses structural violence and trauma as necessary to build the context and implement change for both clients and staff.

 

Bibliography

  • Bloom, S. L. (2005) The Sanctuary Model of Organizational Change for
  • Children’s Residential Treatment. Therapeutic Community: The International Journal for Therapeutic and Supportive Organizations 26(1): 65-81.
  • Feeney, B. & Collins, N. (2004). Interpersonal safe haven and secure base caregiving processes in adulthood. In S. Rholes & J. Simpson (Eds.), Adult attachment: Theory, research, and clinical implications (pp. 300-338). New York: Guilford Press.
  • Loomis, B., Epstein, K., Dauria, E.F. & Dolce.L. (2018). Implementing a Trauma-Informed Public Health System in San Francisco California. Health Education & Behavior First
  • Machtinger, E., Davis, K., Kimberg, L., Khanna, N., Cuca, Y., Dawson-Rose, C., Shumway, M.,
  • Campbell, J., Lewis-O’Connor, A., Blake, M., & McCaw, B. (In Press). From treatment to healing: Inquiry and response to recent and past trauma in adult health care. Women’s Health Issues.
  • Wallin, D. J. (2007). Attachment in Psychotherapy. New York, NY, US: Guilford Press.
     

 

Course Description

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 70% of the US population is living with a chronic illness.  The conditions in which we live have some part in determining why some people have better health outcomes than others. There is a growing interest in multidisciplinary approaches to combat the negative effects of these illnesses on patients’ mental and physical well-being. Mental Health Practitioners and other member of the multidisciplinary team can increase their awareness of social determinants of health and take action to help close the gap on disparities in the social environment. This course examines the five components of the organizing framework for and the emerging strategies to address social determinants of health.

 

Instructor Bio

Dr. Traneika Turner-Wentt, Prevention and Testing Program Manager at Parkland Health & Hospital System, is a Clinical Social Worker with two decades of experience in hospital and mental healthcare. She currently manages the ED Routine Testing Program and supervises community testers. She is committed to empowering high-risk patients and engaging healthcare providers through increased awareness and education. She holds a Doctorate Degree in Clinical Practice and Leadership in Social Work from the University of Tennessee Knoxville.​

 

Learning Objectives

  • Define the key areas of the social determinants of health (SDOH) organizing framework. .
  • Identify opportunities to partner with medical providers to improve healthcare outcomes of patients.
  • Identify the role of a public health assessment tool in policy.

Bibliography

  • Andermann, A., & CLEAR Collaboration (2016). Taking action on the social determinants of health in clinical practice: a framework for health professionals. CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne188(17-18), E474–E483. doi:10.1503/cmaj.160177 
  • Braveman, P. A., Cubbin, C., Egerter, S., Williams, D. R., & Pamuk, E. (2010). Socioeconomic disparities in health in the United States: what the patterns tell us. American journal of public health100 Suppl 1(Suppl 1), S186–S196. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2009.166082 
  • Braveman, P., & Gottlieb, L. (2014). The social determinants of health: it's time to consider the causes of the causes. Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974)129 Suppl 2(Suppl 2), 19–31. doi:10.1177/00333549141291S206 
  • Foege W. H. (2010). Social determinants of health and health-care solutions. Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974)125 Suppl 4(Suppl 4), 8–10. doi:10.1177/00333549101250S403 
  • Singh, G. K., Daus, G. P., Allender, M., Ramey, C. T., Martin, E. K., Perry, C., … Vedamuthu, I. P. (2017). Social Determinants of Health in the United States: Addressing Major Health Inequality Trends for the Nation, 1935-2016. International journal of MCH and AIDS6(2), 139–164. doi:10.21106/ijma.236 

Saturday, July 20, 2019

Course Description

This course will examine the multiple roles of school social workers (counseling, assessments, crisis support, school administration, school-based tasks, and case management) and stakeholders in school settings (i.e. administration, families, teachers, students, etc). The course will also review schools as an institution and how school social workers engage in practice within a host setting to promote social justice and provide mental health services. Additionally, the course will review NASW ethics and specifically how they are aligned (or not aligned in schools). School policies and mental health policies will also be discussed (ie. HIPPA vs FERPA). Students in the course will examine and discuss real ethical case examples from school social work practice (ie. Confidentiality of students when they are hospitalized, information obtained about students from counseling that puts the student at risk of violating school rules) They will be provided tools and decision-making skills to help resolve such dilemmas impacting both social work practice and the multiple stakeholders in schools. Some of these tools will include a decision-making matrix, supervision/consultation, and creating an ethics decision-making committee.

Instructor Bio

Marina A. Badillo, LCSW is presently a doctoral student obtaining a DSW at New York University's Silver School of Social Work. She is a director of counseling services at an elementary and middle school. Prior to this position, she worked as a clinical social worker in community mental health. Marina has completed a Post Graduate Clinical Supervisory Certification from Smith College. Her research interests include organization structure & leadership and social work ethics in schools.

 

Learning Objectives 

  • Define and understand the multiple roles of school social work.
  • Review and examine the ethical dilemmas of social workers in schools.
  • Learn decision making tools and skills to help resolve ethical dilemmas in school social work practice.

 

Bibliography

  • Kelly, M., Frey, A., Alvarez, M., Berzin, S., Shaffer, G., & O'Brien, K. (2010). School social work practice and response to interventions. Children and Schools, 4(1), 201-209.
  • David, D. (2003). School social work: Skills, and interventions for effective practice. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, INC.
  • U.S. Department of Education (2008). Joint guidance on the application of the family education rights and privacy act (FERPA) and the health insurance portability and accountability act of 1996 (HIPPA) to student health records. Obtained December 12, 2009 from wwwe.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/doc/ferpa-hippa.
  • Workers, N.A. (2017). NASW Code of Ethics Guide to Professional Conduct of Social Workers. Washington, DC: NASW.

 

Course Description

Somatic Experiencing (SE) is a bio-psychological model originally developed by Peter Levine for understanding and treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. It has been expanded to treat psychic/somatic/nervous system dysregulation more generally. SE provides perspectives and approaches that are especially helpful in our work with clients who are prone to states of intense over-activation (anxiety, panic, terror, agitation, rage, mortification, etc.) or under-activation (freeze, numbness, emptiness, deadness, etc.). A central aim of SE is to facilitate the restoration and enhancement of the client’s intrinsic regulatory capacities, with the larger goal of bringing a more highly resourced self to the task of processing life’s ongoing experiences (including experiences in the psychotherapy context). SE has particular relevance for people who are vulnerable to the triggering of dissociative states related to trauma.

After many years of practicing psychodynamic therapy and psychoanalysis, Dr. Levit trained in SE. He will discuss his efforts to integrate this approach into psychodynamic psychotherapy. On the theoretical level, he will discuss and contextualize central principals and techniques of SE in terms of psychodynamic paradigms. On the clinical level, he will present psychotherapy process material to illustrate his attempts to interweave this non-psychodynamic approach into psychodynamic treatment. He will also discuss ways in which the weave is not seamless.
 

Instructor Bio

David Levit, Ph.D., ABPP, SEP. Diplomate in Psychoanalysis and in Clinical Psychology. Somatic Experiencing Practitioner (SEP). Faculty positions: Faculty and Supervising Analyst, Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis (MIP); Co-founder, Co-chair, and Faculty, MIP Postgraduate Fellowship Program-West; Instructor in Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School; Adjunct Instructor in Psychiatry, Tufts Medical School. His office is in Amherst, MA where he has been in private practice since 1989. He provides individual therapy and psychoanalysis and consultation for colleagues.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss dissociation and multiplicity of self-states utilizing the conceptual framework of Somatic Experiencing.
  • Consider ways in which dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system effects patients’ psychological capacities, including in session.
  • Discuss ways in which principles and modes of intervention in Somatic Experiencing dovetail with major psychoanalytic paradigms.
  • Consider modes of therapeutic response or intervention from Somatic Experiencing as they might be integrated into psychodynamic psychotherapy.
     

Bibliography

  • Bromberg, P. M. (2008). Shrinking the tsunami: Affect regulation, dissociation, and the shadow of the flood. Contemporary Psychoanalysis 44, 329-350.
  • Eldredge, C. B., & Cole, G. W. (2008). Learning from work with individuals with a history of trauma: Some thoughts on integrating body-oriented techniques and relational psychoanalysis. In F. S. Anderson (Ed.) Bodies in treatment: The unspoken dimension, 79-102. New York: Analytic Press.
  • Levine, P. A. (2010). In an unspoken voice: How the body releases trauma and restores goodness. Berkeley, CA.: North Atlantic Books.
  • Levit, D. (2018). Somatic Experiencing: In the Realms of Trauma and Dissociation –What We Can Do, When What We Do, is Really Not Good Enough. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 28(5).
  • Van der Kolk, B. A. (2014). The body keeps the score: Brain, mind, and body in the healing of trauma. NY: Penguin Books.

*Please note: this is a two-day course which runs on Saturday, July 20th & Sunday, July 21st you must attend both days in order to receive CEs*

Course Description

Traumas that happen more than once--child abuse, sexual abuse, domestic violence, gang violence, and even war are repeated traumas--they are actually repeated relational traumas. They happen inside relationship and must be healed inside relationship. How do we support our clients to engage in treatment that is necessary and terrifying? In this two day program, we will provide you a map to help you guide survivors and their loved ones through that healing process and persevere in the process of getting well. Healing from trauma is not an event or a linear process. It is a series of cycles that spiral through recognizable phases. Over the two days we will be exploring the Cycle of Healing Repeated Trauma which is made up of five distinct phases:

• Preparation (getting ready)
• Unintegration (a controlled coming apart)
• Identification (sorting, identifying, and experimenting)
• Integration (weaving the pieces back together)
• Consolidation (solidifying and stabilizing)

Each phase has its own focus and purpose, as well as its own set of needs to attend to that you as a therapist can support and strengthen. Each phase requires a different set of skills and capacities from the survivor and their guides or support system. What works well in one phase doesn’t necessarily work well in another phase and the cycle of healing repeated trauma is not linear, so it's important to help the survivor to understand that circling back around to a previous stage actually means progress as well as facing new challenges. We will explore trauma from the individual, group and community perspective. In addition to supporting the clients’ work, we will also take time to support our own resilience as guides for healing.
 

Faculty Bio

Gretchen Schmelzer, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and a trauma survivor who has worked for twenty-five years with the complex issues of trauma, integration, and behavior change across every level, from individuals to groups to large systems and countries. She is the founder and editor of The Trail Guide, a web-mag featured on www.gretchenschmelzer.com dedicated to healing repeated trauma and the author of Journey Through Trauma (Avery, 2018).

Carolyn Murphy has over 25 years of experience using psychology and adult learning theories to help individuals and teams change. As both a survivor of repeated trauma and a practicing leadership coach, she is well-versed in trauma healing modalities and has a particular passion for helping trauma survivors thrive at work.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the Three Aspects of Repeated Trauma.
  • Identify and explore the importance of the Preparation Phase and creating a solid 'base camp' for survivor and therapist.
  • Explore in depth the 5-Phase Cycle of Healing from Trauma.
  • Relate attachment theory to trauma treatment.
  • Increase awareness of every level of system to engage clients differently, engage with each other differently, and understand the the organization and community as a whole part of healing interventions.
  • Assess and strengthen areas of resilience as a trauma therapist.

 

Bibliography

  • Herman, J. (2015). Trauma and Recovery: The aftermath of violence from domestic abuse to physical terror. New York: Basic Books.
  • Schmelzer, G. (2018). Journey Through Trauma: A trail guide to the 5-phase cycle of healing repeated trauma. NY: Avery.
  • Terr, L. (1992). Too Scared to Cry: Psychic Trauma in Childhood. NY: Basic Books.
  • Tick, E. (2005). War and the Soul: Healing our Nations Veterans from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Wheaton, IL: Quest Books.
  • Van der Kolk, B. (2015). Trauma and Recovery: The aftermath of violence –from domestic abuse to political terror. NY: Basic Books.
     

Sunday, July 21, 2019

Course Description

This presentation will focus on the transfer of group process clinical skills to effective team interventions; these include listening, contracting, monitoring process, managing conflict, creating a climate of openness, developing group cohesion and addressing diversity issues. These skills are relevant to practice with teams. Yet, social workers have been reluctant to apply them to teamwork. Attendees will be encouraged to share their teamwork experiences and to identify issues that might obstruct their efforts to apply presented strategies. The group will be asked to problem solve with those who do so.

 

Instructor Bio

Julie Abramson, M.S.W., Ph.D. is an emeritus professor, School of Social Welfare at the State University at Albany where she taught social work practice and health-related courses. She is an organizational consultant and trainer, known for her work in the areas of team building, group facilitation, workgroup functioning, diversity and organizational development. Dr. Abramson’s publications relate to collaboration between social workers and physicians, teamwork and decision making for long term care.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize and accept that making teams work is part of their role.
  • Become able to make the link between clinical and teamwork skills.
  • Understand the dynamics of obstacles to teamwork and will be able to identify strategies to address them.

 

Bibliography

  • Bronstein, L. R & Abramson, J.S. (2017). Group process dynamics and skills in interdisciplinary teamwork. In C. Garvin, L. Guttierrez & M.J. Galinsky (Eds). Handbook of Social Work with Groups, 2nd ed., 491-509. New York: Guilford Press.
  • Pullen-Sansfacon, A. & Ward, D. (2014). Making interprofessional working work: Introducing a groupwork perspective. British Journal of Social Work, 44 (5), 1284-1300.
  • Martin, R. (2013). Teamworking skills for social workers. New York: Open University Press.
  • Stahl, G. K., Makela, K., Zander, L. & Maznevski, M. L. (2010). A look at the bright side of multicultural team diversity. Scandinavian Journal of Management, 26, 439-447.
  • Bronstein L.R. & J.S. Abramson. (2003). Understanding socialization of teachers & social workers: Groundwork for collaboration in the schools. Families in Society, 84 (3), 1-8.
     

 

Course Description

This course outlines considerations in using evidence-based practices with individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Evidence-based practices are discussed in terms of their validation in empirical literature as well as applications in applied settings. Interventions to address challenging behaviors, social skills, adaptive living and other domains will be reviewed. A critical review of literature will be emphasized. Learning objective will be met through interactive exercises, multimedia presentations and group discussions.

Instructor Bio

Jennifer is a Licensed and Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA®) who received her Master's degree in behavioral education from Simmons College in Boston, MA. She began her career as a teacher of preschool children with emotional and behavioral disorders in a therapeutic nursery school. After completing her Master’s degree in behavioral studies, Jennifer held positions nationally as well as at the state and local level serving individuals with autism in a variety of settings. Jennifer is currently the Founder/Executive Director of the Fields Center, a Western Mass based non-profit dedicated to serving individuals with autism, their families and the providers that serve them.
 

Learning Objectives

  • Define the characteristics of evidence-based practice.
  • Discuss the need to utilize evidence-based practice in applied settings with individuals with autism.
  • Demonstrate an ability to review and critique literature to determine its relative value to an evidence base.
  • Identify evidence-based interventions across multiple domains of development.

Bibliography

  • Reichow, B.; Doehring, P.; Cicchetti, D.V.; Volkmar, F.R. (Eds.) (2011). Evidence-based practices and treatments for children with autism. New York: Springer.
  • West, E. A., McCollow, M., Umbarger, G., Kidwell, J., & Cote, D. L. (2013). Current status of evidence-based practice for students with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 48(4), 443-455. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1503664619?accountid=166077
  • Schertz, H. H., Reichow, B., Tan, P., Vaiouli, P., & Yildirim, E. (2012). Interventions for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: An evaluation of research evidence. Journal of Early Intervention, 34(3), 166-189. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1312328408?accountid=166077

*Please note: this is a two-day course which runs on Saturday, July 19th & Sunday, July 20th you must attend both days in order to receive CEs*

Course Description

Traumas that happen more than once--child abuse, sexual abuse, domestic violence, gang violence, and even war are repeated traumas--they are actually repeated relational traumas. They happen inside relationship and must be healed inside relationship. How do we support our clients to engage in treatment that is necessary and terrifying? In this two day program, we will provide you a map to help you guide survivors and their loved ones through that healing process and persevere in the process of getting well. Healing from trauma is not an event or a linear process. It is a series of cycles that spiral through recognizable phases. Over the two days we will be exploring the Cycle of Healing Repeated Trauma which is made up of five distinct phases:

• Preparation (getting ready)
• Unintegration (a controlled coming apart)
• Identification (sorting, identifying, and experimenting)
• Integration (weaving the pieces back together)
• Consolidation (solidifying and stabilizing)

Each phase has its own focus and purpose, as well as its own set of needs to attend to that you as a therapist can support and strengthen. Each phase requires a different set of skills and capacities from the survivor and their guides or support system. What works well in one phase doesn’t necessarily work well in another phase and the cycle of healing repeated trauma is not linear, so it's important to help the survivor to understand that circling back around to a previous stage actually means progress as well as facing new challenges. We will explore trauma from the individual, group and community perspective. In addition to supporting the clients’ work, we will also take time to support our own resilience as guides for healing.
 

Instructor Bio

Gretchen Schmelzer, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and a trauma survivor who has worked for twenty-five years with the complex issues of trauma, integration, and behavior change across every level, from individuals to groups to large systems and countries. She is the founder and editor of The Trail Guide, a web-mag featured on www.gretchenschmelzer.com dedicated to healing repeated trauma and the author of Journey Through Trauma (Avery, 2018).

Carolyn Murphy, M.A., has over 25 years of experience using psychology and adult learning theories to help individuals and teams change. As both a survivor of repeated trauma and a practicing leadership coach, she is well-versed in trauma healing modalities and has a particular passion for helping trauma survivors thrive at work.

 

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the Three Aspects of Repeated Trauma.
  • Identify and explore the importance of the Preparation Phase and creating a solid 'base camp' for survivor and therapist.
  • Explore in depth the 5-Phase Cycle of Healing from Trauma.
  • Relate attachment theory to trauma treatment.
  • Increase awareness of every level of the system to engage clients differently, engage with each other differently, and understand the organization and community as a whole part of healing interventions.
  • Assess and strengthen areas of resilience as a trauma therapist.

 

Bibliography

  • Herman, J. (2015). Trauma and Recovery: The aftermath of violence from domestic abuse to physical terror. New York: Basic Books.
  • Schmelzer, G. (2018). Journey Through Trauma: A trail guide to the 5-phase cycle of healing repeated trauma. NY: Avery.
  • Terr, L. (1992). Too Scared to Cry: Psychic Trauma in Childhood. NY: Basic Books.
  • Tick, E. (2005). War and the Soul: Healing our Nations Veterans from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Wheaton, IL: Quest Books.
  • Van der Kolk, B. (2015). Trauma and Recovery: The aftermath of violence –from domestic abuse to political terror. NY: Basic Books.