Ph.D. Adjunct Instructors

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Jonathan Alschech holds a Ph.D. in social work from the University of Toronto, as well as a Ph.D. in history from Tel Aviv University, Israel. Alschech’s research interests and publications include critical quantitative analysis and social work research methodologies, the transformative memorialization of genocide and apartheid, racial, sexual and gender violence and inequality, and unstably-housed men’s experiences of fatherhood and precarious parental involvement. Alschech has practice experience with incarcerated men and Palestinian political prisoners in Israel, young men experiencing racial discrimination and violence in South Africa and street-involved youth and convicted sex offenders in Ontario, Canada.

Adjunct Professor

Katya Cerar, Ph.D., LICSW, is an associate director of Field Education at Smith College and has taught and supervised students from various New England schools of Social Work. Most recently she was the director of young adult and adult community services programs and a program for the Prevention and Treatment of Early Psychosis (PREP) in Western MA. An experienced supervisor and trainer, Cerar has supervised teams of staff in day treatment, outreach and residential services, and has practiced in residential, forensic and outpatient settings, and private practice. She has provided consultation to agencies in a number of areas.

Cerar is a BTTG certified DBT clinician and a certified juvenile court clinician. Primary clinical practice areas include adolescents and young adults with histories of trauma and major mental illness. Cerar holds an M.S.W. from Boston College and a Ph.D. in Social Work from Smith College School for Social Work

Adjunct Professor

Michael J. Constantino, Ph.D. completed his doctoral training in Clinical Psychology at the Pennsylvania State University, a clinical internship at SUNY Upstate Medical University, and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Constantino is currently a Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he directs the Psychotherapy Research Lab and serves as Graduate Program Director. Dr. Constantino’s professional and research interests center on patient, therapist, and dyadic factors in psychosocial treatments; pantheoretical principles of clinical change; and measurement-based care. He has authored over 150 journal articles and book chapters, and over 250 presentations. Dr. Constantino’s work has been recognized internationally, including with his receipt of multiple research grants, awards, and fellowship in the American Psychological Association (APA). Dr. Constantino is also Past-President of the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy and the North American Society for Psychotherapy Research.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Dharma E. Cortés received her bachelor’s and master’s degree in clinical psychology from the University of Puerto Rico, and a doctorate degree in sociology from Fordham University. She completed post-doctoral training in medical anthropology at Harvard Medical School’s Department of Social Medicine. Cortés is an instructor and senior scientist at the Health Equity Research Laboratory at Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School. She is also the director of Latino Projects at Environment & Health Group, a research company seeking technology solutions for global health.

Cortés conducts community-based research on health, mental health, obesity prevention and access to healthcare. She has applied her multidisciplinary training in social sciences to conduct qualitative research for the development and implementation of interventions, surveys and social marketing campaigns, among other activities. Cortés has been principal investigator, co-investigator and consultant to numerous studies on the delivery of health care services.
 

Professor Emeritus and Adjunct Professor

James Drisko’s recent work focuses on evidence-based practice, the common factors model, clinical work with children and families including reactive attachment disorder and its treatment, psychotherapy evaluation and qualitative research methods.

Drisko received his bachelor’s degree in psychology from Amherst College, his M.S.W. from Smith College School for Social Work and his Ph.D. from Boston College Graduate School of Social Work.

Drisko was elected to the National Academies of Practice in Clinical Social Work in 2008 and was named as an inaugural Fellow of the Society for Social Work and Research in 2014.

Adjunct Professor

Tanya Greathouse has been part of the Smith College for Social Work adjunct faculty since 1997 when she completed her doctorate at the school. She teaches in the M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs, focusing on field education, clinical practice, supervision and multicultural awareness, and served as the Marta Sotomayor Fellow in 2015 and 2016. Greathouse is also a lecturer in the Social Work Department of Metropolitan State University of Denver, and serves as the co-coordinator of their Social Work Healthcare Education and Leadership Scholars (HEALS) program and the co-faculty adviser of their Building Allies of Diversity Student Group. Outside of academia, Greathouse is a psychotherapist in private practice, and a consultant trainer to organizations on issues around implicit bias.

Adjunct Professor

Martha Hadley is a psychologist in private practice in New York City, and teaches in the M.S.W. program at Touro College in addition to the Smith College School for Social Work. She is also the associate editor of Studies in Gender and Sexuality. For most of the last decade, she was the managing director of the Michael Cohen Group in New York, which undertakes research studies and scientific evaluations for a variety of organizations and institutions. At the SSW, Hadley teaches courses in research and clinical theory.

Adjunct Professor

Johnnie Hamilton-Mason earned her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work and has been a professor at Simmons College School of Social Work since 1991. Her scholarship and research interests include African American women and families, the intersection of cross cultural theory and practice, HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment, and teaching and learning issues related to diversity. In addition to teaching, Hamilton-Mason co-founded Simmons’ Pharnal Longus Academy for Undoing Racism, served as a Harvard University W.E.B. Du Bois Institute non-resident fellow in African American research and as a researcher at the University of Texas’ Hurricane Katrina Researcher Collaborative, and conducts trainings through the Osiris Family Institute. In 2013, she received the Massachusetts NASW Social Work Educator of the Year Award. Hamilton-Mason also maintains a practice as a senior clinician with the South End Community Mental Health Center in Boston.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

Hugo Kamya is a licensed clinical social worker. Originally from Uganda, Kamya came to the United States more than thirty years ago. He studied at Harvard University, Boston College and Boston University and began a career in the interrelated fields of social work, psychology, and theology. His work has focused on immigrant and international efforts to assess mental health and social service needs of communities. Over the last 20 years, Kamya has facilitated bilateral cultural and educational exchanges between Uganda and the United States. In 2003, he was awarded the American Family Therapy Academy for Distinguished Contribution to Social and Economic Justice in recognition of his work with trauma and immigrant populations. His interest focuses on qualitative research and the intersection of social justice issues across local/global communities. In 2014, Kamya was accepted and inaugurated into the Fulbright Specialist Roster Program as a Fulbright Scholar. Kamya’s research focuses on the social determinants of health, health disparities (e.g., gender, race, immigrant status, social networks, stress, war, poverty, transactional sex, HIV risk) on the health of youth.

Adjunct Professor

Geoffrey Locke earned his M.S.W. and Ph.D. at SSW and has taught in the school since 2005. His courses include Advanced Psychological Theory IV; Knowing, Not Knowing, and Muddling Through; Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families; Brief Psychodynamic Therapy; and Comparative Psychodynamic Theories for Clinical Social Work Practice. He has also served as a faculty field adviser and as part of the Reaching for Excellence faculty.

Locke is in private practice specializing in spiritual, psychological, social, physical, and intellectual wellness.

Adjunct Professor

Maria del Mar Farina earned both her M.S.W. and her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work. She is currently an assistant professor in the M.S.W. program at Westfield State University, and the author of the forthcoming book Ethnic Identity and U.S. Immigration Policy Reform: American Citizenship and Belonging amongst Hispanic Immigrants.

At SSW, del Mar Farina teaches courses in social work practice, helped redesign the clinical practice sequence and she has served as the assistant director of field office.

Del Mar Farina also maintains a private practice in Longmeadow and Springfield, Massachusetts, and had a long tenure as a clinician in the Smith College Counseling Center. In addition to her work in social work practice and education, del Mar Farina worked for many years in nonprofit management.

Adjunct Professor

Nnamdi Pole is a professor in the Smith College Department of Psychology and licensed clinical psychologist. He has taught in the Smith School for Social Work since 2012.
Pole’s work includes research on trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder, especially among police officers and sexual assault survivors. He also has major interests in ethnic minority mental health, psychotherapy research and the psychophysiology of emotion.

Pole is the chair of the Smith College Institutional Review Board. Outside of the college, he serves as an associate editor of Psychological Bulletin and consulting editor of Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. He formerly served on the board of directors of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies and the APA Trauma Division Executive Committee. He is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science.
 

Adjunct Professor

Judith Rosenberger is a professor in the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College. Her areas of expertise include clinical practice, psychodynamic theories, clinical practice with diverse populations and co-occurring disorders. She is also a training analyst and senior supervisor with the Postgraduate Psychoanalytic Society and psychopathology faculty at the Chinese American Psychoanalytic Alliance. Her published work includes Relational Social Work Practice with Diverse Populations (editor) and Brief Case Studies in Abnormal Psychology (co-author). In addition to teaching, she has maintained a private practice for more than 40 years with a psychodynamic psychotherapy orientation. She is the director of the LMSW Examination Preparation program at Silberman/Hunter College School of Social Work, which provides training for over 600 students per year.  

Adjunct Professor

Adjunct Professor

Kay Saakvitne (Sock-quit-knee) is a licensed clinical psychologist who received her doctorate from the University of Michigan in 1986. She was the clinical director of the Traumatic Stress Institute in South Windsor CT for 13 years where, with Laurie Anne Pearlman, she wrote the two original books on vicarious traumatization: Trauma and the Therapist: Countertransference and Vicarious Traumatization in Psychotherapy with Incest Survivors , and Transforming the Pain: A Workbook on Vicarious Traumatization. She is the lead author of Risking Connection, a training curriculum for working with survivors of childhood trauma and the author of its teaching manual, Relational Teaching, Experiential Learning. She has authored a parenting resource handbook, Support for Survivor Parents: Breaking the Cycle of Abuse One Day at a Time and numerous chapters and journal articles.

She is a Risking Connection faculty trainer and a nationally and internationally recognized expert in psychological trauma who has taught workshops and trainings to mental health professionals and offered clinical consultation to hundreds of clinicians for over 30 years. She has received awards for distinguished contribution to the practice of trauma psychology from both the Connecticut Psychological Association and the Division of Trauma Psychology of the American Psychological Association, in which she is a fellow. She is currently in private practice in Northampton, Massachusetts, offering psychotherapy and clinical consultation and has been on the faculty in the doctoral program at Smith School of Social Work since 2008.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

Rosemary Sullivan completed her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social work in 2009. She is an assistant professor of social work at Westfield State University, primarily teaching in the HBSE sequence and diversity and social justice classes.  


Sullivan’s research and teaching interests include identity development among trans people, mandated treatment of family violence offenders, integrating trauma theory into clinical practice, utilizing forensic evaluation techniques in cases of suspected child abuse and social worker preparation for expert witness testimony in criminal and civil trials.


Before completing her Ph.D. she worked as a victim advocate in residential treatment programs with adolescent girls with severe emotional and behavioral problems, as a group therapist for male batterers and for women in substance abuse treatment programs.


At SSW, Sullivan has taught Developmental Deviations in Childhood and Adolescence, Crisis Intervention and Problems in Biopsychosocial Functioning, Child Development and has served as a thesis adviser.