Ph.D. Adjunct Instructors

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

Katya Cerar, Ph.D., LICSW, is an associate director of Field Education at Smith College and has taught and supervised students from various New England schools of Social Work. Most recently she was the director of young adult and adult community services programs and a program for the Prevention and Treatment of Early Psychosis (PREP) in Western MA. An experienced supervisor and trainer, Cerar has supervised teams of staff in day treatment, outreach and residential services, and has practiced in residential, forensic and outpatient settings, and private practice. She has provided consultation to agencies in a number of areas.

Cerar is a BTTG certified DBT clinician and a certified juvenile court clinician. Primary clinical practice areas include adolescents and young adults with histories of trauma and major mental illness. Cerar holds an M.S.W. from Boston College and a Ph.D. in Social Work from Smith College School for Social Work

Adjunct Professor

Michael J. Constantino, Ph.D. completed his doctoral training in Clinical Psychology at the Pennsylvania State University, a clinical internship at SUNY Upstate Medical University, and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Constantino is currently a Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he directs the Psychotherapy Research Lab and serves as Graduate Program Director. Dr. Constantino’s professional and research interests center on patient, therapist, and dyadic factors in psychosocial treatments; pantheoretical principles of clinical change; and measurement-based care. He has authored over 150 journal articles and book chapters, and over 250 presentations. Dr. Constantino’s work has been recognized internationally, including with his receipt of multiple research grants, awards, and fellowship in the American Psychological Association (APA). Dr. Constantino is also Past-President of the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy and the North American Society for Psychotherapy Research.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information available. 

Adjunct Professor

Maria del Mar Farina earned both her M.S.W. and her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work. She is currently an assistant professor in the M.S.W. program at Westfield State University, and the author of the forthcoming book Ethnic Identity and U.S. Immigration Policy Reform: American Citizenship and Belonging amongst Hispanic Immigrants.

At the SSW, del Mar Farina teaches courses in social work practice, helped redesign the clinical practice sequence and she has served as the assistant director of field office.

Del Mar Farina also maintains a private practice in Longmeadow and Springfield, Massachusetts, and had a long tenure as a clinician in the Smith College Counseling Center. In addition to her work in social work practice and education, del Mar Farina worked for many years in nonprofit management.

Adjunct Professor

Tanya Greathouse has been part of the Smith College for Social Work adjunct faculty since 1997, when she completed her doctorate at the school. She teaches in the M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs, focusing on field education, clinical practice, supervision and multicultural awareness, and served as the Marta Sotomayor Fellow in 2015 and 2016. Greathouse is also a lecturer in the Social Work Department of Metropolitan State University of Denver, and serves as the co-coordinator of their Social Work Healthcare Education and Leadership Scholars (HEALS) program and the co-faculty adviser of their Building Allies of Diversity Student Group. Outside of academia, Greathouse is a psychotherapist in private practice, and a consultant trainer to organizations on issues around implicit bias.

Adjunct Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

Johnnie Hamilton-Mason earned her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work and has been a professor at Simmons College School of Social Work since 1991. Her scholarship and research interests include African American women and families, the intersection of cross cultural theory and practice, HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment, and teaching and learning issues related to diversity. In addition to teaching, Hamilton-Mason co-founded Simmons’ Pharnal Longus Academy for Undoing Racism, served as a Harvard University W.E.B. Du Bois Institute non-resident fellow in African American research and as a researcher at the University of Texas’ Hurricane Katrina Researcher Collaborative, and conducts trainings through the Osiris Family Institute. In 2013, she received the Massachusetts NASW Social Work Educator of the Year Award. Hamilton-Mason also maintains a practice as a senior clinician with the South End Community Mental Health Center in Boston.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

Dr. Hugo Kamya, is a licensed clinical social worker. Originally from Uganda, Dr. Kamya came to the United States more than thirty years ago. He studied at Harvard University, Boston College and Boston University and began a career in the interrelated fields of social work, psychology, and theology. his work has focused on immigrant and international efforts to assess mental health and social service needs of communities. Over the last 20 years, Dr. Kamya has facilitated bilateral cultural and educational exchanges between Uganda and the United States. In 2003, he was awarded the American Family Therapy Academy for Distinguished Contribution to Social and Economic Justice in recognition of his work with trauma and immigrant populations. His interest focuses on qualitative research and the intersection of social justice issues across local/global communities. In 2014, Dr. Kamya was accepted and inaugurated into the Fulbright Specialist Roster Program as a Fulbright Scholar. Dr. Kamya’s research focuses on the social determinants of health, health disparities (e.g., gender, race, immigrant status, social networks, stress, war, poverty, transactional sex, HIV risk) on the health of youth.

Adjunct Professor

Geoffrey Locke earned his M.S.W. and Ph.D. at SSW and has taught in the school since 2005. His courses include Advanced Psychological Theory IV; Knowing, Not Knowing, and Muddling Through; Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families; Brief Psychodynamic Therapy; and Comparative Psychodynamic Theories for Clinical Social Work Practice. He has also served as a faculty field adviser and as part of the Reaching for Excellence faculty.

Locke is in private practice specializing in spiritual, psychological, social, physical, and intellectual wellness.

Adjunct Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.