Ph.D. Courses

SSW doctoral student

Course Catalog

The core courses offered for the Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work for the 2021 incoming Ph.D. class are listed below. Current students will find the semester course/section offerings are found on BannerWeb and previous year course descriptions here.
 

Course descriptions listed below are preliminary and will be finalized no later than April 2021. 

Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
Building in parallel with Clinical Theory I, this class focuses on techniques of treatment drawn from the theories of psychodynamic underpinnings.  The client/clinician relationship begins to shift during this first period of addressing conflict as a source of psycho-social dysfunction.  The etiologies of conflict explanations, and of processes of addressing them, are tracked in terms of theory-practice interface.  Specific technical considerations such as dealing with resistance, transference and countertransference, inner-outer world interactions, the role of the clinician, and the like, will be explored.  In all cases the model of practice as evolving in response to new conceptualizations and information and wider world views will be integrated with the theoretical bases of each step of evolution.  As a first class in Practice, students are asked to integrate understanding of the roots of intra-subjective and inter-subjective thinking at this foundational stage of psychodynamic contributions to clinical social work practice. 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
This course will consider differential therapeutic approaches in treating clients who have suffered psychological injuries and experienced developmental ruptures that influence the shaping of relationships with the self and others in social context. Theoretical contributions from object relations theorists Ferenczi, Balint, Klein, Fairbairn and Winnicott as well as self psychologists Kohut and Brandshaft are applied to clinical social work practice in assessment and treatment planning. Specific goals and interventions are described in basic agency-based language as well as theoretical formulations. We will emphasize the role of the clinician in establishing compensatory reparative treatment relationships specifically designed to promote progressive emotional development and self-cohesion. Each theoretical perspective is applied within a social justice and historical context to craft a biopsychosocial-spiritual/structural assessment that guides treatment planning with attention paid to the strengths and limitations of each model. Consideration will be given to modifying these treatment approaches, when appropriate, in ways that are responsive to intersectionality and racial justice. Attention is paid to the roles of trauma and substance use/misuse as well as the conscious use of self that provides the underpinning for clinical case discussions focused on ethical dilemmas and countertransference enactments.  In addition, consideration is given to research methodology that examines clinical processes and most effective interventions.
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
This course examines the formation of an effective working alliance with persons who are members of historically marginalized population that have experienced oppression resulting from their group membership e.g., race/ethnicity, gender, social class and/or sexual orientation among others. Through the analysis of critical race theory and intersectionality, students will come to understand the reasoning for this emphasis. The course begins with an analysis of racism from structural, social, psychological and applied perspectives. The impact of clinical processes (e.g., intersubjectivity, transference and counter-transference, the use of defenses) on the formation of the working alliance with such clients will also be examined. Using case material from their own practice, students will have the opportunity to reassess the impact of their clinical interventions with members from these population groups using a variety of perspectives. 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
Briefly introduces the spectrum of psychodynamic models of clinical social work treatment from their origins in the 1800s to the present.  The role of this knowledge in practice today is explored.  The main content of the course is a progressive study of Conflict Theory/Drive Theory through Ego Psychology, demonstrating these foundational concepts that continue to inform even the most modern theoretical models.  The principle of building blocks rather than total reconstruction applies: theorists like theories are subject to the social and cultural conditions and perspectives of their time, the limitations of which will be addressed. The theorists we will emphasize are S. Freud, A. Freud, their associates as seminal authors, moving on to Erik Erikson and Margaret Mahler as the bridge from the one-person to the two- and multiple-person psychologies.  Development, symptom formation, character, defenses, adaptation, and the clinical methods (emphasized in Clinical Practice 1) they support will be covered.  Other less well recognized theorists will be noted as well as critiques of this early work.  The goal of the class is a grounding in how and why the contributions of these theories remain relevant even as more contemporary approaches to practice and wider inclusion of both the social forces and biological advances surrounding development and present functioning gain prominence in clinical social work.
 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
This course will explore specific developmental theories which help illuminate the inner and interpersonal lives of individuals within a social context. Using object relations and self psychology, students examine how theories are transformed by the internal and external critiques which revise them. Contributions from the following object relations theorists are drawn from Ferenczi, Balint, Klein, Fairbairn and Winnicott as well as Kohut and Brandschaft as self psychologists. Each theoretical perspective is taught within their historical and sociocultural contexts, with attention paid to their biases and strengths. especially as they relate to intersectionality and racial justice. Exploring the role of motivation, health/illness, trauma, and transference/countertransference in each theoretical perspective provides opportunities for comparing and contrasting models.   Students also learn how to apply diverse theoretical lenses to craft a biopsychosocial-spiritual/structural assessment that guides clinical social work practice.
Quarter Hours: 3
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
Quantitative research utilizes numerical data to describe a phenomenon, identify patterns or relationships between variables, or make predictions that may be generalized to the larger population.  This course is an introduction to quantitative research methods. Students in this course will develop an understanding of the ethical, theoretical, practical, and social justice issues that inform the development and implementation of a quantitative research study. Discussion of course reading will focus on the choices researchers made when designing a study and their implications for social work policy and practice. 

Students in this course will learn to critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of different quantitative study designs, focusing on rigor, ethics, and bias. Based on a review of the literature, students will identify a research question and design an empirical research project developing a conceptual framework to define and explain their plans for collecting, analyzing, describing and interpreting study data to ensure rigor. A thorough discussion of their study’s strengths and limitations will be required.  
Quarter Hours: 3
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
In anticipation of future work using quantitative data, students will learn how to generate and interpret basic descriptive and inferential statistics commonly used in social science research.  For descriptive statistics, concepts to be covered include an understanding of variance, different ways to illustrate how data is distributed (histograms, charts, boxplots, graphs, etc.), correlations, reliability and validity.  To understand inferential statistics, we will review hypothesis testing, probability, and tests of significance (confidence intervals, tests of differences, and analysis of variance).  For optimal learning, students will use statistical software to analyze data gaining valuable experience working with and managing data.  Course assignments will require students to communicate results of their analysis in writing, through the use of tables and data visualization.  
Quarter Hours: 3
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
What we label as qualitative research is a large and diverse family of loosely related approaches that vary in purposes, epistemologies or worldviews, and specific methods. Qualitative research and inquiry may seek to be scientific or not, and may draw on Indigenous or western perspectives of knowledge. It generally aims to understand meaning making and processes among people in specific social groups. This course, the first of a sequence of four courses, will first critically examine what is knowledge and how it is located and linked to cultures. The importance of self-awareness and reflexivity regarding one’s own culture, biases, and perspectives is emphasized. The course will then shift to an overview of six types of qualitative research approaches widely found in the social work literature. The six approaches are 1) content analysis which often blends qualitative coding with statistical analysis, 2) thematic analyses and case studies which provide categorical or thick descriptions, 3) grounded theory used for inductive conceptual and theoretical development, 4) participatory action research in which the orienting questions, methods and purposes of the research are largely determined by participants and stakeholders rather than by the researchers, 5) Indigenous and decolonizing methods drawing on non-western worldviews but applying several western research methods for different purposes, and 6) performative, immersion and reflective approaches such as autoethnography that expand and challenge how best to explore the inner life and meaning making and offer additional approaches to presenting qualitative research. These named qualitative approaches illustrate key differences in research purposes, epistemologies, and specific methods. Criteria for assessing the quality of qualitative research are introduced.
 
Quarter Hours: 3
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
This second course on qualitative research will first examine content analysis in which qualitative coding of existing texts is then analyzed using statistical methods or (much less often) interpretive methods.  Issues of deductively shaping research questions, sampling, coding, and writing up results are addressed.  Ethical issues are narrowed by using existing texts created by others for non-research purposes. Next, thematic analysis that applies qualitative coding to a variety of texts, often based on semi-structured interviews is explored.  Issues of deductively shaping research questions, sampling, coding, and writing up results are addressed.  Ethical issues are identified and examined.  Research quality criteria are critically examined using published reports and different worldviews. 

 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
This course will examine the construction and production of social work’s professional knowledge base and its implications for clinical social work practice. Various ontological and epistemological perspectives will be presented and examined, to explore how they affect the nature of the clinical social work encounter and treatment process. Relations of power, including domination, subjugation, marginalization and oppression will be explored in relation to, and through, specific epistemologies, to then reflect on clinical social work practice.   

This course is designed as a seminar course. Students will apply course readings during class discussions to examine how the various conceptual paradigms manifest in their professional work. Brief lectures will be provided to facilitate direct integration of conceptual content; however, the aim of the course is to engage in active discussion, critical analysis and self-reflection.
 
Quarter Hours: 15
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: First Year Doctoral
 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Third Year Doctoral
 
This course invites SSW Fellows to consider the roles of the supervisor, consultant, and advisor in Clinical Social Work practice (knowledge, skills, and values) across the continuum of professional development and practice while
understanding how their intersectional social location interacts with the relationship. Fellows will examine their multicultural intersectionality development to appreciate how their competency in this area of development informs their supervisory and clinical relationships. Fellows will be encouraged to consider differential supervisory styles that
are theoretically informed by the various psychodynamic perspectives and by the developmental needs of supervisees. Similarities and differences in the expectations of settings where clinical social work teaching and practice occurs, whether academic or agency based will be explored. Discussions and role plays of clinical supervision, faculty, academic and consultation will be a regular part of class interactions to promote
greater understanding of educational assessment and evaluation of teaching/learning needs, and the use of self in these contexts.
 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral
 
This five-week course will provide an overview of the neurobiology of behaviors that are essential for clinical social work. It will focus on the neuroscience of attachment and its implications for self regulation and clinical relationships and other
relationships. This focus will include a close examination of the developing brain in the context of parenting and the neurocircuitry supporting emotion, memory, and both conscious and unconscious thought. The course will also briefly discuss the autonomic nervous system and its role in stress and trauma. Finally, the course will present foundational neurophysiology to understand the mechanisms of action of major psychoactive substances of abuse and psychopharmacologic treatments. Influential theories will be highlighted but challenged with contemporary empirical evidence. Empirical evidence will be challenged to demonstrate clinical significance and generalizability to demographically and culturally diverse populations.
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral
 
This five-week intensive course will cover the basic tenets of trauma theory and its application in clinical settings.   The course will offer a historical and political context for clinical theory and address the developmental lines of current trauma theory.  Integrating research on the physiology of trauma with attachment theory, developmental psychology, and the trauma literature, the course will build an integrated model of trauma treatment with a focus on relational models of treatment.  As part of the relational focus, there will be significant attention paid to the person of the therapist within the therapeutic relationship, especially on the constructs of countertransference and vicarious traumatization.  
 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral
 
In this course we will begin by reviewing core clinical ideas in the theories from which contemporary Relational Theory emerged, through retrospection and integration – Ferenczi, Klein, Winnicott, Fairbairn, Sullivan. We will discuss cases written by each of these theorists along with cases presented by students, applying ideas we are reading about while taking a critical perspective about their clinical implications and value.  

In the second part of the course, we will read early, essential papers by Mitchell, Hoffman, Aron, Ghent, Bromberg, Stern, Benjamin, Harris, Dimen, Altman and other contributors to the evolution of Relational theory. Much of their writing speaks directly to the centrality of culture, race, class and gender in clinical process and the social world(s) in which we live. As we read and apply concepts to students’ cases, we will consider how this confluence of ideas evolved into a view of mind embedded in social and relational contexts. We will also be thinking critically about Relational theory as an integration of ideas about therapeutic process focused on: mutual yet asymmetric dynamics, the therapist’s subjectivity and uses of the self, unconscious dialogue and enactment, self-disclosure and impasse, the centrality of culture, race, gender, and gender constructions in clinical work, as well as the nature of therapeutic action(s). We will apply the theoretical concepts we are reading about in our discussion of each other’s case presentations as well as cases in the readings. Our objective will be to consider the relevance and value of different aspects of Relational theory to clinical social work in a range of therapeutic and social contexts.
Quarter Hours: 3
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral
 
This third course in qualitative research first examines grounded theory, an inductive approach to describing populations and developing new concepts and theory.  Shaping research questions where participants are assumed to be more knowledgeable than is the researcher, three purposefully iterative forms of sampling, three iterative methods of data analysis and writing up results are each explored.  Ethical issues and challenges are identified and examined.  Second, participatory action research (PAR) is examined.  PAR seeks to empower participants in generating research questions and methods to best meet local knowledge needs.  PAR applies aspects of other qualitative approaches and methods, all shaped to engage and empower local participants.  Ethical issues are identified and examined, along with the challenges for researchers who must share key choices with participants.  Research quality criteria are critically examined using published reports and different settings.
 
Quarter Hours: 3
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral
 
This fourth course in qualitative research first addresses Indigenous and decolonizing approaches to qualitative  research.  Based on Indigenous worldviews, knowledge needs and practices often differ from those of western research approaches.  Yet many research issues and methods are applied in Indigenous research, in order to generate localized knowledge.  Issues of shaping research questions, sampling, data analysis and reporting are examined.  Ethical concerns from local communities and tribal institutional review boards are explored.  Second, discourse analysis, which explores language as a social practice; what can be said and how it can and should be said, are considered to be socially, rather than individually determined. DA is grounded in the assumption that embedded in the use of language is a matrix of power.  It aims to understand how language is used in varying life situations, their pollical contexts, and purposes.  Issues of shaping research questions, sampling, data analysis and writing up results are addressed.  Ethical issues are explored.  Quality criteria for assessing reports applying each approach are identified and critically examined.
 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral
 
This course will explore the emergence and development of Relational Theory, including its key concepts and their implications for clinical work in social and cultural context(s).  We will begin with an overview of the emergence of contemporary Relational Theory and its antecedents in Object Relations and Interpersonal Theories (Ferenczi, Klein, Fairbairn, Winnicott, Sullivan as well as attachment theory and infancy research). We will then consider early papers and ideas that were written in the 80’s and 90’s, contributing to a shift in the conceptualization of the clinical dyad and a different perspective on clinical work.  With these origins of Relational constructs as a base, we will step back and reflect on the larger context of philosophical and social thinking in which this dialogue of ideas has emerged (e.g., social constructivism and post-modernism, new views on the self in relational and embedded in social context, feminism and more). These changes in our philosophical and social understandings, as well as social actions and movements, have shaped Relational Theory as it continues to evolve.  The core constructs of contemporary Relational theory will be explored, including: new ways of viewing transference and countertransference, mutuality and asymmetry in the clinical dyad, the “relational matrix”, understandings of enactment and emergent experience, the analyst’s use of self, disclosure and restraint, possibilities for considering the self as multiple, shifting ideas about therapeutic action and change, as well as reflections on work with trauma and neglect from a Relational perspective. We will discuss how these and other constructs have evolved in dialogues between voices in what is now a Relational tradition. While the importance of our social embeddedness and the consideration of difference in clinical work will be discussed throughout our study of Relational theory and practice, several sessions will focus on the space that has opened for writing and dialogue that deconstructs and focuses on gender, race, class, intersectionality and social justice in both work with individuals and in our larger social worlds.  We will conclude with readings and discussion of recent critiques of Relational theory and practice, keeping an open mind and posing questions about what’s next or how the work and ideas can continue to evolve.
 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral
 
Health and behavioral health disparities are a difference in outcomes between populations.  The social determinants of health constitute the social and structural factors that drive the health status of individuals and communities.  Social determinants such as structural racism and economic inequality have a documented relationship to health disparities.  This course will prepare leaders in clinical social work practice to begin to address inequities in health and behavioral health care.  Students will first explore how health disparities are defined and measured.  They will examine conceptual frameworks that identify factors contributing to health and behavioral health disparities in the clinical context.  The course will then explore structural interventions designed to ameliorate such disparities, centering those that have been designed and implemented by communities of color. Finally, students will be asked to identify a disparity in their own clinical context, and propose a structural intervention to address it.
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral

This independent study will provide dedicated time to work with a faculty advisor to prepare for the written comprehensive exam. This process will entail regular meetings with the faculty advisor to develop the topic and structure of the comprehensive exam. Students will be expected to gather during the first and final weeks of the term in a seminar style to present their topics and progress.
Quarter Hours: 3
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral

The primary goals of this course are to develop a solid understanding of generalized linear regression models and how to apply them for social work research. The course builds on an introductory level of statistical knowledge (correlation, bivariate tests of group differences) and extends this knowledge into a simple linear regression model framework including evaluating assumptions of regression models. The latter part of the term extends to multivariable regression models, including confounding, moderators and interaction terms. A focus throughout will be on communicating the regression results in writing, tables, and data visualization and in APA style. There will be regular application of these concepts with real social work data using statistical software, including principles of data cleaning and documentation. 
 
Quarter Hours: 3
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral
 
The primary goals of this course are to extend the generalized model to non-linear relationships. The course will investigate transformations of independent and dependent variables, including the logistic transformation. Binary and categorical dependent variables will be modeled with simple and multiple logistic regression; students will develop understanding of odds, odds ratios, and probabilities and how to interpret each. A focus throughout will be on communicating the regression results in writing, tables, and data visualization and in APA style. There will be regular application of these concepts with real social work data using statistical software, including principles of data cleaning and documentation.
Quarter Hours: 15
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Second Year Doctoral
 

Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Third Year Doctoral

This course is designed as both a teaching seminar and a mentored experience to support doctoral students as they provide instructional support to a course in the MSW program.  The course content will examine learning theory, pedagogical methods, authority and the development of one’s teaching identity from an anti-racist perspective.  Specific consideration will be given to teaching clinical material.  Students will explore:  high quality lesson planning, crafting class and student learning objectives, pacing, engagement opportunities, effective feedback and designing assignments, discussions and assessment that promote synthesis and critical thinking.  Additionally, this course will examine conflict in the classroom, boundaries and managing one’s own reactions to challenges and conflict in the role of instructor.  Once students have completed the course, they will have the opportunity to provide instructional support to a course within the MSW program – either as a lead instructor, a co-instructor or an advisor.

 

Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Third Year Doctoral
 
This seminar will focus on the concept of intersubjectivity and its relevance to advanced clinical social work practice. Intersubjectivity theory developed in philosophy and made its way to sociology and psychology. The core concept is that personal experience always emerges, maintains itself, and transforms in relational contexts with others as well as in a larger socio-cultural context. Put differently, mind and experience is embedded in our relational, cultural and social worlds. These are ideas that consider the dynamics of gender, race, class and culture as they are lived between people and groups at the center of our work. In this course we will trace the origins and development of the intersubjective perspective, beginning with a brief introduction to its roots in philosophy and moving on to the study of intersubjectivity in contemporary clinical theories. We will read and consider different ways of thinking about intersubjectivity that are discussed by:  Winnicott, Racker, contemporary Self Psychologists (Stolorow, Atwood, Orange and others), Ogden, Mitchell, Benjamin, and Aron. The clinical implications of these different perspectives on intersubjectivity will be discussed. 

The central concepts that will be covered in our readings and discussion of intersubjectivity theory are: the potential of intersubjectivity to deepen and expand the dyadic (two-person) model of clinical work; new models of transference and countertransference that emerge from consideration of the “clinical field”; mutual influence and its therapeutic value; intersubjectivity in the experience of difference (race, class, culture, age… ); uses of the therapist’s subjectivity; different ways of understanding and using “the third” in clinical practice; enactment and learning from enactments as they are viewed from several perspectives;  understanding the self as unitary or as decentered; intersubjectivity in non-verbal realms and meaning beyond language; integrating different modes of therapeutic action; intersubjectivity and dissociation in the treatment of trauma; and research on practice as it relates to these topics. We will be applying these ideas to cases presented by students in class as well as reading and discussing cases in the readings.  Woven throughout our sessions will be reflections on the implications of intersubjectivity for race, class, culture, gender and “difference” as it is embedded in our social and personal worlds, often manifested unconsciously or implicitly in clinical interactions.
 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Third Year Doctoral
 
This independent study will provide dedicated time to work with a faculty advisor to prepare for the dissertation proposal. This process will entail regular meetings with the faculty advisor to develop the topic and structure of the dissertation proposal. By the end of this independent study, students should each have a topic, a conceptual framework, and an idea for a research plan / data source. Students will be expected to gather during the first and final weeks of the term in a proseminar style to present their topics and progress.
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Third Year Doctoral
 
This seminar provides social work graduate students with ample grounding in the nature, history, evolution, and current status of the adult psychotherapy field from empirical, theoretical, and practice-based perspectives. As the title implies, the seminar will emphasize science-informed practices, with a review of research on, and controversies about, empirically supported treatments, evidence-based practice, and practice-based evidence. In doing so, prominent psychotherapy research methods will be highlighted. The seminar will also address issues related to the dissemination of and training on effective psychotherapeutic practices, and it will infuse ethical and multicultural considerations related to the study, theory, and practice of psychotherapy.
 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Third Year Doctoral
 
This course is the capstone course in the research methods sequence. The purpose of this seminar is to prepare doctoral students to begin work on their dissertation proposal. At this stage, most students are still formulating their dissertation ideas, this course advances their thinking through assignments that focus on the conceptual and methodological issues encountered in developing a dissertation proposal. This seminar fosters student’s progress by providing individual consultation, peer review, and discussion of the design efforts of each class member. Course assignments include a review, assessment, and critique of a completed dissertation as well as the development and presentation of a research question and accompanying conceptual framework suitable for a dissertation proposal. The final paper in this course will lay the foundation for the introductory chapter of a dissertation proposal and provides students substantive material for discussion with potential dissertation committee members.
 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Third Year Doctoral
 
In this seminar, students will have opportunities to examine some of the issues involved in teaching theory and practice to social work students and professional social workers. Course materials cover a range of topics including perspectives on the setting in which teaching occurs, trauma informed education, teaching diverse groups, critically reflective teaching, theories of adult learning, supporting learning differences, universal design for learners, curriculum design, and anti-oppression pedagogy. Students will reflect upon the course content and their own teaching style to develop a philosophy of teaching.

Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Third Year Doctoral

This independent study will provide dedicated time to work with a faculty advisor to prepare for the dissertation proposal. This process will entail regular meetings with the faculty advisor to develop the topic and structure of the dissertation proposal. By the end of this independent study, students should each have a more written background of their topic and framework, a developed set of research questions and hypotheses, and a detailed plan for data collection and analysis. This should culminate in a concisely written and well-argued draft of a dissertation proposal (~20 pages in length) and a slide deck for a 15 minute presentation of the proposal. Students will be expected to gather during the first and final weeks of the term in a proseminar style to present their topics and progress.

Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Third Year Doctoral
 

This course will focus on the integration of psychoanalytic theory, research and practice within a socio historical context. The course addresses the paradigm shift in psychoanalytic theory and practice from Freud’s metapsychology to contemporary clinical work. Attention is given to understanding the complex use of self in clinical practice with diverse clients. Students will critically examine the way in which intersectional identities are subjectively and relationally experienced in the world, including the ways in which clinicians and clients unconsciously enact interlocking oppressions. The course will also address the prevailing assumptions about power, privilege and various forms of oppression in the theories that underlie our practice as well as the benefits and limits of evidence-based research when working with psychoanalytic constructs such as subjectivity and intersectionality. 

Quarter Hours: 3
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Third Year Doctoral

This course will extend further the intermediate regression modeling course material to more complex statistical models common in social work research. First, students will develop an understanding of how to test mediation hypotheses with path analysis or structured equation modeling. Second, students will understand and apply multilevel models that facilitate testing clustering or interdependence between observations in the data; examples include dyadic analyses (couples or provider/client), or individuals within communities. These concepts will be applied regularly with social work data using statistical software.

Quarter Hours: 0
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills:
Eligibility: Doctoral
 
Quarter Hours: 2
Coordinating Sequence: Doctoral
Fulfills: Doctoral Core
Eligibility: Doctoral