M.S.W. Adjunct Instructors

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Ziblim Abukari is an associate professor and BSW program director in the Department of Social Work at Westfield State University, where he has been teaching in the B.S.W. and M.S.W. programs since 2011. His research interests include risks and resilience in high-risk youth, academic outcomes of high-risk youth, resilience across cultures, international social development and human security and social protection. Abukari is also a faculty field liaison and field instructor, and advises Westfield State’s Social Work Students Association Group and the Social Work Honor Society, Phi Alpha.

During the Smith summer program, he teaches Social Work Research Methods and Child Development.

Before his academic career, Abukari was a community social worker and youth services advocate, and worked as a community organizer and trainer with nonprofits in Ghana on food security, agribusiness development, micro-credit and water and sanitation. He has also worked in after school programs in Colorado.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Rose Marie Äikäs is a professor at CUNY-Queensborough Community College, where she teaches courses in criminal justice and social work. Her current research projects measure college readiness in incarcerated students, and look at the education and internship experiences of human service students who were formerly incarcerated.

Before her academic positions,  Äikäs worked in a variety of mental health settings, including in a program providing support for formerly incarcerated people pursuing college degrees, as a senior case manager in halfway houses, as a mental health clinician in prisons, and as a counselor in children and family services. In 2016, New York State Corrections and Community Supervision named her Volunteer of the Year.

At the Smith College School for Social Work Äikäs has taught Substance Abuse Policy, Treatment and Services; and Criminal Justice Policies: Implications for Social Work Practice.

Lecturer

Elizabeth Anable is doctoral candidate at Smith College School for Social Work and a clinical supervisor with Clinical & Support Options in Northampton, where she manages a team of practitioners in the crisis department.

Anable is also a certified Somatic Experiencing® practitioner, teaching assistant and training coordinator, and has a background in mindfulness and meditation practices. She specializes in the integrated treatment of trauma and chronic stress, and is interested in body-mind practices as an avenue for supporting activists and disenfranchised communities.

In her research Anable focuses on the integration of body-mind practices and evidenced-based clinical interventions, psychophysiological measurement to improve assessment and treatment of trauma and PTSD, and post-traumatic growth and community resiliency work.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Autumn Asher BlackDeer is a member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and is a doctoral student at Washington University in St. Louis’ Brown School of Social Work. Her research is focused on the intersections of sexual violence, mental health, and substance use within American Indian populations. Autumn has 5 years of experience working in various inpatient psychiatric hospitals where she facilitated psychoeducational groups and ensured patient safety before earning her M.S.W. at the University of Oklahoma - Tulsa. In order to reduce the sting in statistics, BlackDeer teaches several courses to both master’s and doctoral students, including Foundations of Data Analysis, Biostatistics, and a SAS Skill Lab. BlackDeer is a strong proponent for American Indian higher education, advocate for survivors of sexual violence, and is committed to addressing health disparities within Indian Country.

Lecturer

Kareem Ayodeji is a University of Saint Joseph adjunct faculty member, supervising M.S.W. students in a clinical preceptorship. He is also a social worker in the Hartford, Connecticut, public schools, providing group, individual and family counseling, and the former associate dean of student culture at Achievement First, a public charter school.

Ayodeji earned his M.S.W. at the University of Connecticut School of Social Work, with a concentration in policy practice. He is currently pursuing a doctorate in educational leadership at the University of Hartford.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Neil Bilotta is a social worker and researcher focusing on two independent and intersecting phenomena: (a) deconstructing racism/White Supremacy in social work practice, education, policy, and research and (b) exploring the overt and subtle effects of Eurocentrism, Colonialism, Whiteness, and Othering on refugee resettlement processes. He examines how emancipatory and participatory research and decolonizing epistemologies can shift social work theory/interventions to align with refugees' realities, as opposed to outside, top-down approaches.

Bilotta has taught Anti-Oppression in Social Work Practice, Global Social Problems, and Social Welfare Policy. He has worked as a social worker with “unaccompanied refugee minors” in the U.S. Bilotta's recent work explored Eurocentric research practices with refugee young people in Kakuma refugee camp, Kenya. Bilotta has published articles on international social work field placements and deconstructing power and colonialism in research/research methodologies with refugee communities.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Tyler Boudreau is a writer, activist, and instructor. He earned a master’s and doctorate in Communication at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, with a concentration in Performance Studies. His scholarly interests include performance theory, writing, and autoethnography, personal narrative, and Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) as they intersect with global human rights and social justice. He has taught courses on research writing, public speaking, communication theory, and rhetoric. Boudreau has written and presented extensively around the country on war, occupation, military culture and doctrine, and other veterans issues.

This work is based on both academic research and personal experiences from his twelve years in the U.S. Marine Corps. Among his publications is his book, Packing Inferno: The Unmaking of a Marine, an account of America’s occupation of Iraq in 2004. Boudreau participated in the 2010 Truth Commission on Conscience in War, a nationwide attempt to critically examine the questions of conscience facing American service members. His current work is focused on the concepts and attitudes surrounding moral injury, its effects on veterans in the aftermath of violent combat operations, and performative approaches to recovery.

For more information about Boudreau’s activist work and publications, see his website: tylerboudreau.com

Adjunct Associate Professor

Stephen Bradley is a Fellow of the Child Trauma Academy, who received his M.Ed. in Counseling from Umass Amherst in 1992 and his M.S.W. from Smith College School for Social Work in 2002. He worked for 20 years in non-profit agencies including supervising and directing intensive home based and residential programs in MA and CT. He has been on the adjunct faculty at Smith College School for Social Work since 2010, where he has taught First Year Practice, Family Theory, and Community Practice with Youth and Families.

He’s been in full time private practice since 2014 where he specializes in work with youth and families struggling with the effects of developmental trauma and teaching / training / consulting around the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics. He has a lifelong commitment to weaving social justice and anti-oppression frameworks into all areas of his work.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Oklahoma State Representative Chelsey Branham is a Native Chickasaw and lifelong Oklahoman. She has always been drawn to seeking a global perspective and cross-cultural connection. Through her work, she connects diverse communities to bring people together through the sharing of cultures and the building of positive relationships. Drawing on her training in economics and development at Oklahoma University, Branham spent time in Zambia working to create economic opportunities and conducting research on improving humanitarian aid. She returned home to put her experience in program development to use at YWCA and other nonprofits to help Oklahomans struggling with a variety of barriers. As a community educator, she works every day to create opportunities for those that have experienced many of life’s greatest challenges.

She serves on numerous nonprofit boards, such as CommUNITY Alliance, Suited For Success, and the Police and Community Trust. In November 2018, she was elected to the OK House of Representatives in House District 83. She is the first woman and minority representative to ever hold the seat, and she works to create a positive collaborative environment to help move our state forward.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Rachel Briggs is a lecturer in the department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at University of Massachusetts Amherst. She has a Ph.D. from University of Massachusetts. Briggs is currently co-assistant editor for the 4th edition of Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice (forthcoming). She teaches Sociocultural Concepts at Smith College School for Social Work. 

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Suzanne Brown, who earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work, is an assistant professor at the Wayne State University School of Social Work in Detroit, Michigan, and maintains a private practice in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Her areas of expertise include mothers with substance use disorders; effects of neighborhood violence and social networks on parenting competence among mothers; neurobiological dimensions of addiction and trauma; and gay and lesbian family formation and adoption.

Before receiving her Ph.D., Brown was the clinical director of the May Institute in Boston, where she was responsible for supervising outpatient mental health services, case management services, and day treatment programs for adults and elders with persistent mental illness. 

Brown’s current projects include research on the perceived parenting competence among mother with substance use disorders and on parenting enhancements in substance abuse treatment.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Lecturer

Natasha Campbell is a clinician at Providence Behavioral Health Mercy Hospital in Holyoke, Massachusetts, working with children and adults, individually and in group therapy. She is also a psychotherapist at the CHD Clinic in Easthampton, Massachusetts, providing outpatient clinical therapy to adults and children.

Before her current positions, Campbell was a program manager at the Children’s Study Home in Springfield, Massachusetts. She has also provided trainings and curriculum development to social service professionals such as judges, lawyers, policy makers and social workers who influence child welfare. Campbell earned her M.S.W. at Barry University in Florida.

Adjunct Assistant Professor​

Carter is a senior lecturer at Lesley University and president of Psychoanalysis for Social Responsibility (APA Division 39 Section IX). A clinical social worker in full-time private practice in Amherst, MA, Carter's clinical and academic work primarily concerns issues of race and racism. Carter is a doctoral candidate at Smith College School for Social Work and his dissertation is a psychoanalytic study of the role of Whiteness in U.S. school shootings. He is a graduate of New York University, Simmons University and the Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis' Post-Graduate Fellowship Program. Carter teaches courses on race and racism, psychoanalytic theory, and assessment and diagnosis at SSW, and has facilitated SSW's Pedagogy & Diversity seminar.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Associate Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

Michael J. Constantino completed his doctoral training in Clinical Psychology at the Pennsylvania State University, a clinical internship at SUNY Upstate Medical University, and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Stanford University Medical Center. Constantino is currently a professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he directs the Psychotherapy Research Lab and serves as graduate program director. Constantino’s professional and research interests center on patient, therapist, and dyadic factors in psychosocial treatments; pantheoretical principles of clinical change; and measurement-based care. He has authored over 140 journal articles and book chapters, and over 240 presentations. Constantino’s work has been recognized internationally, including with his receipt of multiple research grants, awards, and fellowship in the American Psychological Association (APA). Constantino is also past-president of the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy and the North American Society for Psychotherapy Research.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Johanna Crocetto is an assistant professor of Social Work and field coordinator at Cabrini University. Her current clinical practice provides clinical supervision to practicing clinicians, as well as consultation, professional trainings and expert testimony in understanding the dynamics of child trauma, the impact trauma has on victims and their families, and methods of trauma-informed care. Her scholarly interests include trauma and its impact on families, the application of trauma-informed care in educational and practice settings, and the role of self-reflection in social work practice.

Crocetto earned her DSW at the University of Pennsylvania, her M.S.W. from Smith College School for Social Work and her M.S. in Psychology from Bucknell University. She also completed a graduate certificate in child sexual abuse treatment from Widener University.

Lecturer

Janet Curley is a social worker with a clinical focus in MBSR, ACT, CBT and CBT-I, and more than 30 years of experience in the field. She is currently an integrated behavioral health clinician at Baystate Medical Practices in Western Massachusetts, where she provides individual, family and group treatment in a primary care setting. Previously, Curley was a program manager in behavioral health at Baystate Franklin Medical Center, where she managed a 22-bed inpatient adult psychiatric unit and partial hospitalization program. She earned her M.S.W. at Simmons College School of Social Work.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

Seth Dunn has taught at the Smith College School for Social Work since the summer of 2003, and has been the course coordinator for Family Theory for Clinical Social Work Practice. He has also had a long history supervising and training Smith M.S.W. students during their field education.

In addition to teaching, Dunn is a clinician and director of quality management with ServiceNet in Northampton, and maintains a private practice. His areas of focus include family/marital problems and substance abuse disorders.

For more than twenty years, Dunn served on the New York Council on Accreditation as a team leader and peer reviewer in their accreditation of human service operations. This included several years as the peer reviewer for the United States Marine Corps Counseling & Family Advocacy Programs.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

Kris Evans is currently the director of the Counseling Center and Interim Director of the Schacht Center for Health and Wellness at Smith College. Evans has over 20 years experience working as a clinical social worker, program director, community consultant, and clinical educator. Evans' clinical work and research interests are informed by contemporary psychodynamic, trauma, and critical psychology theories within a social justice frame. Evans has taught a range of theory and and practice courses, but is currently focused on her role as course coordinator of the comparative psychodynamic theory class and her elective on perspectives on transference and countertransference.

Adjunct Professor

Maria del Mar Farina earned both her M.S.W. and her doctorate at the Smith College School for Social Work. She is currently an assistant professor in the M.S.W. program at Westfield State University, and the author of the forthcoming book Ethnic Identity and U.S. Immigration Policy Reform: American Citizenship and Belonging amongst Hispanic Immigrants.

At the SSW, del Mar Farina teaches courses in social work practice, helped redesign the clinical practice sequence, and she has served as the assistant director of field office.

Del Mar Farina also maintains a private practice in Longmeadow and Springfield, Massachusetts, and had a long tenure as a clinician in the Smith College Counseling Center. In addition to her work in social work practice and education, del Mar Farina worked for many years in nonprofit management.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Lecturer

Reihonna Frost-Calhoun is pursuing a doctorate in clinical psychology at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. Her research is in adoptive families and child development in the context of adoptive families.

Frost-Calhoun is a co-instructor of Research on Diverse Families and Sexualities at Clark University and a research assistant in the Clark Research in Diverse Families Lab. She is also a Rudd Adoption Research Scholar in the UMass Rudd Adoption Research Program.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Lecturer

John Gill is the chief operating officer of Beats Rhymes and Life in Oakland, California, an organization, developed by Smith College School for Social Work alum Tomás Alvarez III, that uses the process of creating rap music to engage troubled teens in mental health services. He is also dean of the BRL Academy, which is a career pipeline program to train young adults between the ages of 18 and 26 to become social workers and leaders. In this role, he has designed course tracks in clinical practice, clinical theory, social justice, teaching artistry and professional development.

Gill earned his M.S.W. at the SSW in 2007, and spent many years working with youth and families involved in foster care and the juvenile justice system before beginning his work with BRL.

Adjunct Professor

Paul Gitterman has been associated with the Smith College School for Social Work since the early 1990s, first as an M.S.W. student, and then as a clinical instructor and as an adjunct professor. He also holds a master’s degree in Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology from the University College London and the Anna Freud Center.

Gitterman works at Williams College Psychological Services, providing psychotherapy, supervision, and outreach services. In addition, he maintains private practices in Williamstown and Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Carnella Gordon-Brown is a licensed clinical social worker with an independent practice in San Francisco, California working with Traditional Aged Youth and Adults living with symptomatology resultant from profoundly traumatic life experiences. Gordon-Brown is an adjunct professor at California Institute of Integral Studies, School of Community Mental Health (CMH) in San Francisco; and serves as Psychoanalysis for Social Responsibility Section Representative, to the Board of Directors, of the Society for Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Psychology, of the American Psychological Association.

She honors her privilege of attaining her clinical experience within the San Francisco Department of Public Health’s, Community Behavioral Health Service; where for a decade, as a clinical social worker, psychotherapist, and clinical manager of a CMH Clinic she received the precious gifts of wisdom and relational work experiences through her work with the riotous, incredibly generous and resilient consumers of community mental health.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor​

Andrew Hoang is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Hong Kong, where he completed his Ph.D. (2015-19) on the cultural politics and psychosocial construction of school-based support services. His research focuses on the interprofessional provision of social work, counselling, pastoral care, and guidance practices in schools. He studies their connections to street-level bureaucracy, advanced marginality and social mobilities of diverse youth.

Hoang’s teaching is informed by comparative perspectives on social welfare and education from Canada, Hong Kong and Mainland China. He is passionate about guiding students’ learning to develop their own unique forms of critical practice, including anti-oppression sensibilities, and skills of social and cultural analysis for future clinical work.

Before entering the field of social work, Hoang was employed as an officer in the customs and immigration agency of the Canadian Federal Government. He holds an MSW from Wilfrid Laurier University and a BA (Honors) from Western University.

Lecturer

Andres Hoyos is a psychotherapist in private practice in New York, and teaches at the schools of social work at NYU and Columbia University. His areas of interest include substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, immigration, political asylum, trauma and work with LGBTQ+ individuals and communities, and he teaches Adult Psychopathology and Pathways to Wellness.

Hoyos also worked for many years in mental health services at the the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center in New York. He holds an M.S. in psychology, a postgraduate certificate in strategic planning from UNIVERSITY EAFIT, Medellín, Colombia, and an M.S.W. from NYU.

Adjunct Professor

Debra Hull is a psychology professor and program coordinator of the mental health sciences concentration at Wheeling Jesuit University in West Virginia, where she’s received many teaching awards. She teaches courses in methods, human sexuality and industrial/organizational psychology, and her research interests include teaching strategies, body image, ambiguous dating situations and attitudes toward health.

During the Smith College School for Social Work summer program, Hull teaches Advanced Research Methods in the M.S.W. program. Hull is also an EMT with her community’s volunteer fire department and frequently travels abroad on service trips.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Associate Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Alex Kim is a 2012 graduate of Smith School for Social Work, where he completed internships with the Northampton Public Schools and the Northampton VA Medical Center.

Kim is a staff counselor at the Amherst College Counseling Center, providing individual, group, and crisis services to students, and training/consultation to the larger campus community. He has previously worked in school mental health and family outreach support services, and was a Social Work Fellow at Boston Children's Hospital. His areas of clinical and scholarly interest include AEDP, internal family systems theory, CBT, ACT, restorative justice practices, and the psychology of gaming (videogaming, board games, and intrinsic motivation).

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

Geoffrey Locke earned his M.S.W. and Ph.D. at the Smith School for Social Work and has taught in the school for more than a decade. His courses include Knowing, Not Knowing, and Muddling Through; Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families; Brief Psychodynamic Therapy; and Comparative Psychodynamic Theories for Clinical Social Work Practice. He has also served as a faculty field adviser and as part of the Reaching for Excellence faculty.

Locke is in private practice in Amherst, Massachusetts, specializing in the long-term treatment of adults with complex mental health and addiction related disorders, including compulsive gambling. He is licensed as a Massachusetts Problem Gambling Specialist, a Certified Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor and a Certified Gambling Specialist.

Adjunct Professor

Gael McCarthy is a clinical social worker in private practice in Durham, North Carolina, serving as a Smith College Ph.D. student clinical supervisor, and has recently taught clinical practice with children, research methods, and child development, as well as a course for doctoral students in clinical supervision.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Patricia McManamy is a psychotherapist with ServiceNet, in Northampton, working with children, adolescents, families and adults, with a focus on trauma, adoption, child abuse and sexual behavior problems in children, as well as narrative, play and expressive arts therapies.

In addition to her practice, McManamy is the director of the Office of Counseling, Prevention and Victim Services at the Diocese of Springfield, Massachusetts, coordinating outreach, advocacy and therapeutic services to victims of clergy abuse. She also serves as an expert witness in child and family evaluations for the Committee for Public Counsel Services.

McManamy earned her M.S.W. at Smith College School for Social Work in 2000, and has taught theories of child development courses in the Human Behavior in the Social Environment Sequence since 2008.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Jesse Metzger is a licensed clinical psychologist and University Psychologist at the University of Rhode Island, where she works as a clinician at the URI Counseling Center and teaches undergraduate courses within the Psychology Department. She has also been an Adjunct Professor at SSW for the past five years, teaching psychoanalytic theory and multiple related courses. She was previously the Director of Training of the APA-accredited Multicultural Psychology Doctoral Internship Program in Springfield, MA. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Columbia University, and B.A. in psychology and art from Williams College. She completed her doctoral internship at Mt. Sinai in Queens, NY, and a postdoctoral fellowship at McGill University in Montréal, QC.

Alongside her clinical career, Dr. Metzger has worked for 15+ years as an independent writing consultant for students and academic professionals. She is also an accomplished Lego® artist and builder of large-scale models on commission.

Adjunct Professor

Lujuana Milton is the owner and outpatient clinician at South Shore Child and Family Counseling in Braintree, Massachusetts. In addition to administratively managing her practice, she works with children, adolescents, and adults. She is currently an Adjunct faculty at Fisher College in Boston and Boston College School of Social Work in Chestnut Hill.

Lujuana earned her M.S.W. at Boston College School of Social Work in 2007. She has over 12 years of clinical experience in the field and has worked in a number of settings addressing issues of anxiety, depression, substance abuse, opposition/defiance, and trauma. She has been trained extensively in a number of treatment approaches including traditional talk therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). She has also provided training and workshops to local school districts as well as local and national organizations.

Adjunct Associate Professor

AndreAs Neumann Mascis is a clinical psychologist with areas of specialty that include gender variance, trauma, and physical and psychiatric disabilities. Neumann Mascis founded and developed The Meeting Point, a collaboration of independent healthcare providers in Jamaica Plain, MA. The Meeting Point serves intersecting communities including the LGBTQ community, survivors of trauma, and disability communities. The Meeting Point is founded in the knowledge that social justice heal, and is growing to meet the unique strengths and needs of people through community activity, personalized approaches, and physical and mental health care that is responsive to the needs of complex bodies and identities.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Carmen Monico teaches courses with a global perspective and in international settings. At Elon University, Monico taught introduction to human services, global experience, Guatemala Practicum, Global Violence Against Women, and Human Trafficking, and mentored IRB-approved research projects on sexual assault, migration, human trafficking, and selfcare. At the Virginia Commonwealth University, Monico taught undergraduate-level social justice and graduate-level social welfare courses.

While serving as a Rotary Ambassador and Research Scholar, Monico conducted dissertation research on the experience of Guatemalan women whose children were stolen, trafficking and adopted internationally, published in a book in Spanish. While serving as a U.S. Fulbright Scholar at the Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, Monico conducted research on educational opportunities for youth at risk and taught a PhD-level course on advanced qualitative research methods. Monico scholarship includes publishing extensively on civic engagement, global migration, and human trafficking; presenting at national and international conferences; and delivering professional workshops.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Tamarah Moss is an assistant professor at the Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research at Bryn Mawr College. Her main research interests are threefold: 1) evaluation in community practice and health service delivery; 2) health equity among pregnant adolescents, LGBTQ+ and HIV positive communities; 3) international social work and social work education. Moss brings experience in culturally responsive and equitable evaluation, qualitative and mixed methodology, and public health social work.

During the Smith College School for Social Work summer program, Moss has experience teaching as an adjunct in Agency and Community Practice and Research Methods.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Luma Muhtadie earned her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at UC Berkeley, where her research focused on the psychophysiology of stress and interoceptive awareness. She completed a clinical postdoctoral residency at the Greater Los Angeles VA in Women’s Mental Health and Trauma Recovery Services. During this residency, Luma developed novel curricula for several experientially oriented group therapies, including a Race-Based Traumatic Stress and Resilience group. Muhtadie has received fellowships from the National Institutes of Mental Health and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada for her scholarly achievement and innovative research. She has co-authored more than a dozen articles in peer-reviewed journals and contributed as an author/editor to numerous books. A longtime practitioner of yoga and meditation, Muhtadie has traveled internationally to study, teach, and co-facilitate workshops that integrate Western affective science with Eastern contemplative practice. Muhtadie is currently an adjunct faculty member at California State University, Los Angeles.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Nestor Noyola is pursuing a Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. Overall, Noyola's research interests include understanding the mental health of sexual, gender and racial minorities from an intersectional perspective. Noyola is a Ford Foundation predoctoral fellow.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Arden O’Donnell is an alum of the Smith College School for Social Work M.S.W. program and a doctoral student at Boston University. She has more than 15 years’ experience in palliative care both nationally and internationally, beginning with her work with HIV/AIDS patients in the United States and in Africa.

O’Donnell is currently a research coordinator in cardiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where she’s the co-investigator on a pilot study of focused palliative care intervention with high-risk heart failure patients. She is also the founder and president of Coalition for Courage, a nonprofit based in Zimbabwe that provides educational and psychosocial support for HIV orphans.

At SSW, O’Donnell teaches Introduction to Social Welfare Policy.

Adjunct Professor

Christopher O’Rourke is the director of social work training at the Albert & Jessie Danielsen Institute at Boston University, a mental health clinic and training institute focused on integrating spirituality and psychotherapy. He also maintains a psychotherapy practice in Boston, working with individuals, couples and groups.

O’Rourke earned his M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work as well as a Master’s of Divinity at Harvard Divinity School, and has taught in the SSW since 1998. His summer courses include The Role of Religion & Spirituality in Clinical Social Work, and Issues in the Treatment of Mental Illness: Treatment & Social Policy Perspectives. He has also served as a core faculty member of the school’s Contemplative Psychotherapy Certificate Program.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Lecturer

Mischa Peck is the founder and CEO of a psychotherapy practice, Q Counseling Services, in Phoenix, Arizona. Her practice and scholarly interests include gender and sexuality, LGBTQ issues, gerontology, survivors of traumatic childhoods, EMDR, social cognition and appraisal, subjective well-being, instructional development and curriculum planning.

Peck earned an M.S.W. from UCLA, a master's in nonprofit management from Hebrew Union College, and a doctorate in social welfare from the University of Washington. She served on the faculty at San José State and Arizona State Universities, where she taught undergraduate and graduate students in a variety of subjects including clinical practice, human development and diversity.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Professor

Nnamdi Pole is a professor in the Smith College Department of Psychology and licensed clinical psychologist. He has taught in School for Social Work since 2012.

Pole’s work includes research on trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder, especially among police officers and sexual assault survivors. He also has major interests in ethnic minority mental health, psychotherapy research, and the psychophysiology of emotion.

Pole is the Chair of the Smith College Institutional Review Board. Outside of the college, he serves as an associate editor of Psychological Bulletin and Consulting Editor of Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. He formerly served on the Board of Directors of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies and the APA Trauma Division Executive Committee. He is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Malcolm Pradia is a Clinical Social Worker at the Center for Counseling and Psychological Health at his alma mater the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Prior to joining UMass, Pradia worked as an inpatient social worker at The Brattleboro Retreat, a free standing psychiatric hospital in southern Vermont. Pradia has also worked in a public high school, co-leading a specialized transition program for students returning to school from therapeutic programs and out of district placements. Pradia's approach to individual and group practice is psychodynamic, and he is committed to dismantling systems of oppression in order to minimize suffering and enhance the opportunity for more peace.

Pradia received an M.S.W from Smith College School for Social Work in 2013 and teaches Group Theory and Practice.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Beth Prullage is the director of clinical programming at Providence Behavioral Health Hospital, a 125-bed inpatient psychiatric hospital in Holyoke, Massachusetts. She has worked at Providence for more than 10 years in a number of clinical positions, including as the director of social services, and as the senior clinician on the child and adolescent unit. She is also part of the faculty of Re-Authoring Teaching, an online consultation group on Narrative Therapy, and has served as a bereavement group counselor with the LGBT Aging Project.

Prullage earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work in 2001. She has served as a field faculty adviser and thesis adviser, and has taught Family Approaches: Narrative Therapy with Youth and Families, Group Theory and Practice, Social Work Practice for Individuals and Families, Family Theory, Dialogic, Feminist and Narrative Family Therapy and Couples Therapy.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Alexandra Klein Rafaeli, Psy.D. is the coordinator of short-term, empirically supported treatments for the Psychological Services Division of Tel Aviv University. She is an adjunct instructor for the psychology department at IDC-Herzliya in Israel and does trainings internationally in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT). She has published theoretical articles and case studies of IPT therapy and is currently leading the development of an IPT-based protocol for university counseling centers.

At the SSW, Rafaeli has taught an elective course in Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT).

Lecturer

Cristian Rangel is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto. His scholarly interests include medical education, HIV/AIDS prevention, Canada’s gay Latino community and the HIV/AIDS vulnerability of immigrants.

Rangel’s current research looks at how physicians’ humanitarian and advocacy work for refugee care and non-status immigrants influence human rights and political discourse in Canada and Spain. At the University of Toronto, Rangel teaches Introduction to Research Methods, The Sociology of Medicine, Community and Policy and Sociology of Health Care.

Adjunct Associate Professor​

Julieann Rapoport has found her vocation at the cross-section of education, social change, and the social sector. For more than 30 years, Rapoport has worked with and learned from communities that have been marginalized, in the U.S. and abroad. She specializes in participatory methods of data collection and analysis to guide organizational and community assessments, planning processes, evaluation protocols, and program design. She holds an undergraduate degree in psychology and sociology from Harvard University, a master's degree in bi-literacy and non-formal education from University of Massachusetts/Amherst, and a Certificate in Evaluation Practice from The Evaluators' Institute at George Washington University's Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration. At SSW, Rapoport teaches courses on macro-practice.

Adjunct Professor

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Lecturer

Chiedza Rodríguez is the executive director of GARO Consulting, a technical assistance and training company focused on youth development, prevention programming for youth, and professional development for youth serving agencies. Her work includes the facilitation of leadership development trainings and organizational structure designs, as well as board retreats for non-profit organizations such as CT Students for a Dream, Hearing Youth Voices and A Better Way Foundation. Previously, she was director of talent development at Our Piece of the Pie, a youth development nonprofit.

Rodríguez has also taught group dynamics at Capital Community College in Hartford, Connecticut, and helped design the curriculum for their community change studies degree program.

She earned a master’s in human services, organizational management and leadership at Springfield College, and is currently pursuing a law degree at Western New England University School of Law.

Lecturer

Michael Rogers is clinical social worker with 40 years of experience, predominantly as a child, family and group therapist in child guidance agencies. More recently he treats college students at Sacramento State’s and UC-Davis’ Counseling & Psychiatric Services and in private practice. He is a graduate of SCSSW’s Advanced Clinical Supervisor program and has supervised more than 100 field instructees and associate clinical social workers. He also treats CA LCSWs whose licenses are suspended. 

He is a Smith College School for Social Work Ph.D. who also holds an M.B.A. in nonprofit management. 

Rogers is also a longtime board member, and former president, of the California Society for Clinical Social Work. He currently serves as chair of the Ethics Committee and the CEU Committee. 

 

Lecturer

Rebecca Ross is a psychotherapist in private practice, specializing in gender identity, sexuality, non-monogamy, depression, anxiety, trauma, family, couples, grief and loss. She is also a member of the faculty at the Ackerman Institute for the Family, teaching Foundations in Family Therapy, and a clinical associate with the Gender & Family Project in New York, which provides gender affirmative services, training and research.

Ross has presented nationally on providing affirmative clinical services for families of gender nonconforming and transgender children and adolescents. She earned her M.S.W from the Smith School for Social Work, and has completed post-graduate training in couples and family therapy at the Ackerman Institute for the Family and open dialogue at the Institute for Dialogic Practice.

Adjunct Professor

Tracy Ross, an alumna of the Smith College School for Social Work M.S.W. program, is a sociology professor at Holyoke Community College. At HCC, Ross teaches courses on intimate relationships, race and ethnicity, social problems, and substance abuse. During the SSW summer program she teaches History of American Social Welfare and Introduction to Social Problem Analysis.

Before joining the faculty at HCC, Ross had a long tenure as a clinical social worker with social service organizations in Western Massachusetts, including the Pioneer Developmental Services and Early Intervention Program and the New England Learning Center for Women In Transition (NELCWIT).

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Rachel Rybaczuk is a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at UMass Amherst and has deep roots in teaching and community organizing. Her research interests include food and farming; queer theory; race, class, gender, and sexuality; and social change and social movements.

She has taught Social Class and its Implications for Social Work and Sociocultural Concepts in the Smith College School for Social Work. Rybaczuk has also taught at Boston University and Hampshire College, and has served as the Coordinator of Faculty Development Programs and the Coordinator of Graduate Student Teaching and Career Support at the Institute for Teaching Excellence & Faculty Development at UMass.

As a community organizer in the Pioneer Valley, Rybaczuk has worked with Springfield No One Leaves, the Commonwealth Center for Change and Classes De Ingles, and she leads college workshops and trainings on recognizing and addressing issues around class and classism.

Adjunct Associate Professor​

Shannon Sennott, a sex educator, gender justice activist, and LGBTQAI+ family therapist, earned her M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work in 2008.

Sennott is the co-founder of Translate Gender, Inc. and the Center for Psychotherapy and Social Justice (CPSJ), she was clinically trained at SSW and the Eastern Group Psychotherapy Society in New York City, and is an AASECT certified sex therapist. Sennott maintains a private practice at the CPSJ and utilizes a transfeminist and dialogic therapeutic approach in her work with individuals, adolescents, and families. Her specialization extends to working with couples, non-monogamous relationships, and groups.

Included in her practice, Sennott offers clinical supervision, clinical training, and therapeutic intensives. She has also contributed numerous articles and chapters for publication and is co-author of the new clinical guide "Sex Therapy with Erotically Marginalized Clients: Nine Principles of Clinical Support" publish by Routledge Press.

Adjunct Assistant Professor​

No biographic information is available.

Lecturer

Liat Shklarski is a doctoral candidate in social welfare at the Hunter College Silberman School of Social Work, focusing on foster care. She earned her M.S.W. at the University of Washington. Shklarski teaches courses in clinical practice, child welfare and human behavior in the social environment at Hunter, and serves as a research assistant on projects supporting foster families. Shklarski has worked as a therapist for the Jewish Board of Family and Children Services in the Bronx, as well as at other mental health facilities, often with children. She currently has a private practice in New York City, working with adolescents, adults, couples and families.

 

Adjunct Associate Professor

Davey Shlasko is the founder and managing consultant of Think Again Training & Consulting, a small consulting group that helps organizations address issues of diversity, equity, inclusion and justice through professional development training as well as structure and policy interventions.

An alum of Smith’s undergraduate program, Shlasko earned a master’s degree from UMass Amherst in Social Justice Education. Shlasko worked for many years in direct service and supervision for human services, in the areas of health education/risk reduction counseling, workforce development and leadership training. In addition to SSW, Shlasko teaches occasional classes in Gender & Women's Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

At the Smith College School for Social Work, Shlasko teaches Sociocultural Concepts and Transgender Studies: Theory, Practice & Advocacy, and served as a Sotomayor Fellow for three years from 2017 through 2019.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

No biographic information is available.

Adjunct Instructor

After graduating from the Smith College School for Social Work M.S.W. program, Stefanie Speanburg went on to earn a doctorate in women’s, gender and sexuality studies at Emory University, focusing on women with borderline personality disorder. She has a private practice in Atlanta, Georgia, working with individuals and couples, as well as therapists and other helping professionals, and teaches at Emory University.

Speanburg has served as a research adviser for Smith master’s students since 2005, and has been part of the adjunct faculty since 2015, teaching Comparative Psychodynamic Theories for Social Work Practice and Introduction to Theories of Human Behavior.

Adjunct Professor

Ruth Spencer has been part of the adjunct faculty of the Smith College School for Social Work since 1997, teaching Family Law and Social Justice & the Law. She is currently the associate vice president for human resources at Vassar College, and was the director of human resources at Oberlin College before that.

In addition to her work in human resources, Spencer spent many years working in social services and for mental health organizations. She was the director of human resources of the Cleveland Psychiatric Institute, director of social services of the Cuyahoga County Correctional Center, director of mental health at the J. Glen Smith Health Center in Cleveland, and has worked as a psychiatric social worker and as a parole officer.

Lecturer

Melissa Weise is a doctoral candidate in the Smith College School of Social Work and earned her M.S.W. from Boston College. She has a private practice in Ware, Massachusetts, working with various populations, including chronically mentally ill, self harming/suicidal, trauma survivors, neuroatypical autism spectrum and LGBTQA.

Weise is program director of ServiceNet’s PREP, an early intervention program for young adults experiencing early psychosis, and teaches at Holyoke Community College, Elms College and Boston College. She has worked in human services for more than a decade, in outreach and advocacy, child abuse prevention, youth advocacy and education programs.

Adjunct Associate Professor

Kurt White is the director of ambulatory services at the Brattleboro Retreat, a psychiatric hospital and addiction treatment center in Brattleboro, Vermont, where he oversees all outpatient, intensive outpatient and partial hospitalization programs. White is also a therapist at the Brattleboro Retreat Anna Marsh Behavioral Health Care Clinic, seeing adults with mental health and/or addictive disorders. He is president of the Vermont Association of Addiction Professionals and presents widely on issues around substance abuse.

An alum of the Smith College School for Social Work M.S.W. program, White has been part of the faculty since 2006 and teaches Group Psychotherapy Theory and Practice.

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Mark Williams is an assistant professor at Fitchburg State University. His research focuses on same-sex partnerships and the health of LGBT older adults, and he teaches courses in direct practice skills, gerontology and CBT.

Williams also holds a Master of Divinity and served as a United Methodist pastor in churches in the Seattle area, and worked as a grief counselor at Providence Hospice of Seattle.

Adjunct Professor

Kirk Woodring is the chief clinical officer at the Brattleboro Retreat, a psychiatric hospital and addiction treatment center in Brattleboro, Vermont. He has presented and published widely on suicide and substance abuse, and is the co-author of Assessing the Risk: Suicide Assessment in the Hospital Environment of Care.

Woodring earned his M.S.W. at the Smith College School for Social Work in 1995 and has been associated with the college as a clinical supervisor and adjunct faculty for 20 years. At Smith, Woodring teaches courses in group theory and advanced group practice, and coordinates the first year group theory and practice courses.